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The C++ Standard Library separates data structures from algorithms, such as with std::sort:

template< class RandomAccessIterator >
void sort( RandomAccessIterator first, RandomAccessIterator last );

I would like to maintain separation of algorithms and data structures when the algorithms require intermediate scratch space.

With this goal in mind I wanted to implement an image algorithm that requires intermediate scratch space between the input and output image. One could allocate the necessary scratch space in the function call, however due to the size and frequency of these calls with images of identical size it would severely degrade performance. This makes it much more difficult to separate the data structure from the algorithm.

One possible way to achieve this is as follows:

// Algorithm function
template<typename InputImageView, typename OutputImageView, typename ScratchView>
void algorithm(
  InputImageView inputImageView, 
  OutputImageView outputImageView, 
  ScratchView scratchView
);

// Algorithm class with scratch space
template<typename DataStructure>
class Algorithm {
public:
  template<typename InputImageView,typename OutputImageView>
  void operator()(
  InputImageView inputImageView, 
  OutputImageView outputImageView
  ){
    m_scratch.resize(inputImageView.size());
    algorithm(inputImageView,outputImageView,makeView(m_scratch));
  }

private:
  DataStructure m_scratch;
}

Is the above an effective algorithm + scratch space design to follow, or is there a better way?

Side note: I am using the boost::gil library

share|improve this question
1  
The usual way is to give the algorithm an interface to a generic data-structure, with no specification on how that data-structure is implemented, eg. if your algiorithm requires a queue, pass in an IQueue that has push() pop() and peek() functions; the actual implementation could be a linked-list, a heap, or whatever. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 14 '13 at 23:06
    
itchy algorithm? –  thang Feb 14 '13 at 23:07
2  
At least in C it is more common to have an "itch" function that tells you how large a scratch space you need to pass, but relying on a resize function looks ok. –  Marc Glisse Feb 15 '13 at 0:07
    
What is a scratch space? –  AlexWien Mar 14 '13 at 21:18
    
@AlexWien Temporary memory used during a calculation or inside an algorithm that is not part of the input or result. Is there perhaps a better word or description for it? –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 21:19

4 Answers 4

I think in such a case, I'd have the algorithm allow you to pass (a reference or pointer to) a structure for the scratch space, and give that argument a default value. This way the user can call the function without passing a structure when/if the extra time to allocate the structure isn't a problem, but can pass one if (for example) building a processing pipeline that can benefit from reusing the same space repeatedly.

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I believe the design example in my question follows the design you advocate in your answer, correct? –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 20:17
    
@AndrewHundt: Yes, it looks like what you've added implements what I described. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 15 '13 at 15:02

The design your initial question presents using resize() is not efficient, since the resize may require not just allocation, but will also copy existing content from the old allocation to the new. It will also require allocating and filling the new space before deallocating the old, increasing the maximum peak memory usage.

It's preferable to provide some way for the client code to calculate how large a structure must be provided as scratch space, and then assert that the passed scratch space satisfies the library routine's needs at entry. The calculation could be another method of the algorithm class, or the allocation/factory for the scratch space object could take appropriately representative arguments (right size/shape, or the sizes themselves) and return a suitable and reusable scratch space object.

The worker algorithm shouldn't have to 'manipulate' the scratch space in any way to make it suitable once it's been asked to use it, because that manipulation is apt to be expensive.

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One could create a separate algorithm object for each size they are working on, if there is a small set of sizes. If there is not then resize() is definitely inefficient. However, it would be hard to deal with a scratch object where the size of the object is required for the algorithm. Perhaps there is a way to easily allocate a larger size and use only a portion of it I'm not thinking of? –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 20:03
    
Why should the algorithm depend on the size of the scratch object, beyond it being "big enough"? The scratch object should just contain enough space for the algorithm to allocate according to its needs. –  Novelocrat Mar 14 '13 at 22:29
    
If an object is being used, you may only be able to represent a single size with a single allocation. For example, accessing begin() and end() on different size image may require changing the size of the object. In my case the size does not change so it is not a problem, but for the more general question it does apply. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 15 '13 at 0:03

If you use a function object, you can carry whatever state you need.

Two useful algorithms are transform and accumulate.

transform can take a function object to perform the transformation on each object in the sequence:

class TransformerWithScratchSpace {
public:
    Target operator()(const Source& source);
};

vector<Source> sources;
vector<Target> targets;
targets.reserve(sources.size());

transform(sources.begin(), sources.end(),
          back_inserter<Target>(targets),
          TransformerWithScratchSpace());

accumulate can take a function object which accumulates all the objects into itself. The result is the accumulated object. The accumulator itself doesn't have to produce anything.

class Accumulator {
public:
    Accumulator& operator+()(const Source& source);
};

vector<Source> sources;

Accumulator accumulated = accumulate(sources.begin(), sources.end(),
                                     Accumulator());
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that you don't know the location of the current element you are looking at in the transform, so how do you access the cached value? That is, for any N values being operated on, there are also N values being stored at the intermediate step, so the location in the intermediate cache would need to be known at each step of the transform. Perhaps there is something I missed? –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 19:59
    
The idea is that you have a batch of images and wish to apply the same transform to each image, and don't have to re-allocate a scratch space for each image; you re-use the scratch space. Are you talking about applying multiple transforms to an image instead? –  Peter Wood Mar 14 '13 at 20:50
    
Both actually, multiple transforms are performed on a single image and Multiple images are processed. However, images aren't all available at once. Imagine running multiple transformations on each image as it comes in from a webcam. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 21:08
    
For each image do you want to produce one output image, or multiple images? Is the transform always the same? Do you want to compose a pipeline of transforms, which use the same scratch space? –  Peter Wood Mar 14 '13 at 21:21
    
Yes, I am composing a pipeline of transformations, and the transform is always the same. For each input image there are one or more output images depending on which step in the pipeline, and those intermediate steps are then combined to a final result. This pipeline is run once per input image as they arrive, so it is efficient to only allocate the intermediate images once. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 14 '13 at 21:29

As you mentioned, this question can really be thought of as going far beyond images in scratch space. I've actually come across this in many different forms (memory sections, typed arrays, threads, network connections, ...).

So what I ended up doing was to write myself a generic "BufferPool". It's a class which manages any form of buffer object, be it a byte-array, some other piece of memory, or (in your case) an allocated image. I loaned this idea from the ThreadPool.

It's a fairly simple class that maintains a pool of Buffer objects from which you can acquire a buffer when you need one and release it back to the pool when you're done with it. The acquire function will check whether there is a buffer in the pool available, and if not, will create a fresh one. If there is one in the pool, it will reset the Buffer, i.e. clear it so that behaves identical to a freshly created one.

I then have a couple of static instances of this BufferPool, one for each different type of Buffer I use: One for byte arrays, one for char arrays, ... (I'm coding in Java, in case you are wondering... :) I then use these static instances in all of the library functions I'm writing. This allows me that, for example, my cryptography functions can share byte-arrays with my binary flattening functions, or any other code in my application. This way, I get maximal reuse of these objects and it has given me a major performance increase in many cases.

In C++ you might be able to implement this use-everywhere scheme very elegantly by writing a custom allocator for the data structures you need based on this pooling technique (Thanks to Andrew for pointing this out; see comments).

One thing I did for my byte-array buffer is that the acquire function will accept a minimumLength parameter that specifies the minimum size of the buffer I need. It will then only return a byte array of at least this length from the pool, or create a new one, if the pool is empty or only has smaller images in it. You could use the same approach with your image buffer. Let the acquire function accept a minWidth and minHeight parameter and then return an image of at least these dimensions from the pool, or create one with exactly these dimensions. You could then have the reset function only clear the (0, 0) to (minWidth, minHeight) section of the image, if you even need it cleared at all.

The one feature that I decided to not worry about in my code, but you might want to consider depending on how long your application will run for and how many different image sizes it will process is whether you want to limit the buffer size in some way and free up cached images to reduce memory use of your application.

Just as an example, here is the code I use for my ByteArrayPool:

public class ByteArrayPool {

    private static final Map<Integer, Stack<byte[]>> POOL = new HashMap<Integer, Stack<byte[]>>();

    /**
     * Returns a <code>byte[]</code> of the given length from the pool after clearing
     * it with 0's, if one is available. Otherwise returns a fresh <code>byte[]</code>
     * of the given length.
     * 
     * @param length the length of the <code>byte[]</code>
     * @return a fresh or zero'd buffer object
     */
    public static byte[] acquire(int length) {
        Stack<byte[]> stack = POOL.get(length);
        if (stack==null) {
            if (CompileFlags.DEBUG) System.out.println("Creating new byte[] pool of lenth "+length);
            return new byte[length];
        }
        if (stack.empty()) return new byte[length];
        byte[] result = stack.pop();
        Arrays.fill(result, (byte) 0);
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Returns a <code>byte[]</code> of the given length from the pool after optionally clearing
     * it with 0's, if one is available. Otherwise returns a fresh <code>byte[]</code>
     * of the given length.<br/>
     * <br/>
     * If the initialized state of the needed <code>byte[]</code> is irrelevant, calling this
     * method with <code>zero</code> set to <code>false</code> leads to the best performance.
     * 
     * @param length the length of the <code>byte[]</code>
     * @param zero T - initialize a reused array to 0
     * @return a fresh or optionally zero'd buffer object
     */
    public static byte[] acquire(int length, boolean zero) {
        Stack<byte[]> stack = POOL.get(length);
        if (stack==null) {
            if (CompileFlags.DEBUG) System.out.println("Creating new byte[] pool of lenth "+length);
            return new byte[length];
        }
        if (stack.empty()) return new byte[length];
        byte[] result = stack.pop();
        if (zero) Arrays.fill(result, (byte) 0);
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Returns a <code>byte[]</code> of the given length from the pool after setting all
     * of its entries to the given <code>initializationValue</code>, if one is available.
     * Otherwise returns a fresh <code>byte[]</code> of the given length, which is also
     * initialized to the given <code>initializationValue</code>.<br/>
     * <br/>
     * For performance reasons, do not use this method with <code>initializationValue</code>
     * set to <code>0</code>. Use <code>acquire(<i>length</i>)</code> instead.
     * 
     * @param length the length of the <code>byte[]</code>
     * @param initializationValue the
     * @return a fresh or zero'd buffer object
     */
    public static byte[] acquire(int length, byte initializationValue) {
        Stack<byte[]> stack = POOL.get(length);
        if (stack==null) {
            if (CompileFlags.DEBUG) System.out.println("Creating new byte[] pool of lenth "+length);
            byte[] result = new byte[length];
            Arrays.fill(result, initializationValue);
            return result;
        }
        if (stack.empty()) {
            byte[] result = new byte[length];
            Arrays.fill(result, initializationValue);
            return result;
        }
        byte[] result = stack.pop();
        Arrays.fill(result, initializationValue);
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Puts the given <code>byte[]</code> back into the <code>ByteArrayPool</code>
     * for future reuse.
     * 
     * @param buffer the <code>byte[]</code> to return to the pool
     */
    public static byte[] release(byte[] buffer) {
        Stack<byte[]> stack = POOL.get(buffer.length);
        if (stack==null) {
            stack = new Stack<byte[]>();
            POOL.put(buffer.length, stack);
        }
        stack.push(buffer);
        return buffer;
    }
}

And then, in the rest of all my code where I need byte[]'s, I use something like:

byte[] buffer = ByteArrayPool.acquire(65536, false);
try {
    // Do something requiring a byte[] of length 65536 or longer
} finally {
    ByteArrayPool.release(buffer);
}

Note, how I added 3 different acquire functions that allow me to specify how "clean" I need the buffer to be that I am requesting. If I'm overwriting all of it anyways, for example, there is no need to waste time on zeroing it first.

share|improve this answer
    
How is this more efficient than writing a custom allocator for your use case? I'm guessing it may not be as simple to write a custom allocator in java as it is in C++, since Java is garbage collected. –  Andrew Hundt Mar 15 '13 at 15:18
    
@AndrewHundt I haven't done much with C++, so I didn't know about the concept of custom allocators. I don't think this would be any more efficient than a custom allocator, rather I would say that this could be one way of implementing a custom allocator. Which, I guess, is then what I would suggest to do in your case! ;) Let me know if I understand the concept right and if this makes sense. Then I can specifically mention the "custom allocator" keyword in my answer. –  Markus A. Mar 15 '13 at 17:53
    
Yes, a custom allocator does make sense for improving the performance in C++ for specific use cases like this. From yours and the other responses it looks like the design I proposed in the original question is a good one, plus customizing the allocator for specific use cases and performance optimization makes sense. Keep in mind the original question is more tied to design than performance, though performance is important. Here is a description of allocators in C++: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/concept/Allocator –  Andrew Hundt Mar 15 '13 at 18:42
    
@AndrewHundt: Thanks for the reference! This is a really interesting concept. I updated my answer to include this idea. I wonder if Java has an analogue... It's funny, I guess I'm still a bit old-school when it comes to coding. For me performance concerns pretty much always dictate design to a huge extent, unless it really affects maintainability. Back when the 80386 was all the rage, there wasn't much room for the "conceptually clean and maintainable" coding that today forces everyone to buy the latest hardware just to run mine sweeper without dropped frames! ;) –  Markus A. Mar 15 '13 at 19:59

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