Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So here's what I'm trying to do in a little nutshell, I'm just gonna start with code and it will most likely make sense.

<bl:InnerGlowBorder x:Name="glow"
                    InnerGlowColor="Teal">
  <bl:InnerGlowBorder.Style>
    <Style TargetType="bl:InnerGlowBorder">
      <Style.Triggers>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ViewUnitStatus}"
                     Value="UnitStatusModel.Pass">
          <Setter Property="InnerGlowColor"
                  Value="Green" />
        </DataTrigger>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ViewUnitStatus}"
                     Value="UnitStatusModel.Fail">
          <Setter Property="InnerGlowColor"
                  Value="Red" />
        </DataTrigger>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ViewUnitStatus}"
                     Value="UnitStatusModel.Indeterminate">
          <Setter Property="InnerGlowColor"
                  Value="Yellow" />
        </DataTrigger>
        <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding ViewUnitStatus}"
                     Value="UnitStatusModel.Warning">
          <Setter Property="InnerGlowColor"
                  Value="Orange" />
        </DataTrigger>
      </Style.Triggers>
    </Style>
  </bl:InnerGlowBorder.Style>
</bl:InnerGlowBorder>

And the enum definition:

namespace SEL.MfgTestDev.ESS.ViewModel
{
    public enum UnitStatusModel
    {
        Indeterminate,
        Pass,
        Fail,
        Warning,
    }
}

Am I missing a piece to make this work? I've found some WPF articles on enums that rely on object data sources and I don't really like that solution, isn't there something more simple I can do here?

share|improve this question
2  
InnerGlowColor="Teal" The issue was that if the field being set by a style is overriden in the base the triggers won't change anything. –  Firoso Sep 28 '09 at 18:57
    
+1 I was just about to respond to that effect. Post your own answer and then accept it. :) –  Zach Bonham Sep 28 '09 at 21:27
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have found the solution and it was quite silly.

Styles are designed as a sort of visual template for a control, but they are designed as a base for visual implementation, not as a be-all/end-all visual model.

As a result, I had a situation in which my template dictated what the InnerGlowColor should be. However, by applying the attribute InnerGlowColor="Teal" to the element, I've created an override in effect, ignoring my visual style. The solution was to simply remove the dependancy property in the element declaration.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.