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I'm curently having some problem with a grep command.

I've found the way to only show the last line of a grep search :

grep PATERN FILE_NAME | tail -1

I also find the way to make a grep search in multiple selected files :

find . -name "FILE_NAME" | xargs -I name grep PATERN name

Now I would like to only get the last line of the grep result for each single file. I tried this :

 find . -name "FILE_NAME" | xargs -I name grep PATERN name | tail -1

This returns me only the last value of the last file where I would like to have the last matching patern for every file. Do someone knows a way to do this?

thanks a lot!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
for f in $(find . -name "FILE_NAME"); do grep PATERN $f | tail -1; done
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works great! thank you! :D –  B.jour Feb 15 '13 at 12:48

How about this good sir

find . -name "FILE_NAME" -print0 | while read -d '' aa
do
  grep PATTERN "$aa" | tail -1
done
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same spirit than the first comment, works perfectly! –  B.jour Feb 15 '13 at 12:49

you can use find to execute commands too:

find . -name "<file-name-to-find>" -exec grep "<pattern-to-match>" "{}" ";" | tail -1

"{}" is the file name, take care with shell globing and expasion when writing the command

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The quickest way to do this would be get the output last 1 (or more) lines from the files and then grep through that. So -

tail -1 filenames.* | grep "what you want to grep for"

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There is a solution without the need for loops, this gives what the OP wants.

find . -type f -exec sh -c "fgrep print {} /dev/null |tail -1" \;

./tway.pl:print map(lambda x : x[1], filter(lambda x : x[0].startswith('volume'), globals().items()))
./txml.py:           print("%s does not exist: %s\n" % (host, error))
./utils.py:print combine_dicts(a, b, operator.mul)
./xml_example.py:print ET.tostring(root, method="text")

Compared without the tail -1 gives Too many lines per file but proves the above works.

find . -type f -exec sh -c "fgrep print {} /dev/null" \;

gives:

./tway.pl:print map(lambda x : x[1], filter(lambda x : x[0].startswith('volume'), globals().items()))
./txml.py:           print("%s resolved to --> %s\n" % (host, ip))
./txml.py:           print("%s does not exist: %s\n" % (host, error))
./utils.py:print "a", a
./utils.py:print "b", b
./utils.py:print combine_dicts(a, b, operator.mul)
./xml_example.py:    print ">>"
./xml_example.py:    print ET.tostring(e, method="text")
./xml_example.py:    print "<<"
./xml_example.py:print ET.tostring(root, method="text")

EDIT - remove the /dev/null if you don't want the filename included in the output.

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Another way to find the last line is to reverse the file and output the first match.

find . -name "FILE_NAME" | xargs -I name sh -c 'tac name|sed -n "/PATTERN/{p;q}"'
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