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I need to to go through the a and b arrays, copying the elements from a and b into combo in such a way that combo ends up being sorted.

For instance, if a were {3, 5, 7, 7, 9} and b were {2, 5, 8, 1234} (so combo must have 9 elements), then this function will set combo to {2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 7, 8, 9, 1234}. I need to this efficiently: when I put the values into combo, I need to put them in the right location; not haphazardly and rearrange them later.

I tried a nested for loop in a while loop but I'm getting some strange results. I can't seem to figure out a way to get past the lowest number. For example, once I add the lowest number to the combo array I can;t figure out how to discard it per se. Thanks for the help.

void merge( 
    unsigned combo[], 
    const unsigned a[],
    unsigned aElements,
    const unsigned b[],
    unsigned bElements 
){

    if (mySort(a, aElements) == 0) {
        cout << "The first array is not sorted";
        exit(1);
    }

    if (mySort(b, bElements) == 0) {
        cout << "The second array is not sorted";
        exit(1);
    }

    unsigned combinedElements;
    unsigned lowest = 0;
    unsigned i = 0;

    combinedElements = aElements + bElements;

    while (i < combinedElements) {
        for (int n = 0; n < combinedElements; n++) {
            if (a[i] < b[n]) {
                lowest = a[i];
            }

            else {
                lowest = b[n];
            }
        }

        combo[i] = lowest;
        i++;
        cout << combo[i] << endl;
    }


}
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Why was my function prototype edited? –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:37
    
I can't use 'merge' –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a very compact solution which should be easy to read and understand.

I am assuming that combo has enough space to fit the result and that a and b are already ordered (as your example suggests):

void merge(unsigned combo[], 
           const unsigned a[],
           unsigned aElements,
           const unsigned b[],
           unsigned bElements)
{
    while(aElements + bElements > 0)
    {
      if(bElements == 0 || (aElements > 0  && *a < *b))
      {
          aElements--;
          *combo++ = *a++;
      }
      else
      {
          bElements--;
          *combo++ = *b++;
      }
   }
}

It could be slightly tweaked for better performance, but it is very elegant and readable. As a plus, this code is both C and C++ compliant.

share|improve this answer
    
Using these arrays: unsigned a[] = {3, 5, 7, 7, 9}; unsigned b[] = {2, 5, 8, 1234}; unsigned combo[9]; I got the output: 3,5,7,7,9,2,5,8,1234, –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:50
    
I corrected a stupid typo, please try again. –  fons Feb 14 '13 at 23:56
    
will do. Thanks. –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:57
    
Hmm. Now I got the output: 2,3,5,5,7,7,8,9,0. It seems the 0 is taking place of 1234. –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:59
    
I was missing a simple condition. I'm sorry, I am writing this from the top of my head. Please try again –  fons Feb 15 '13 at 0:14

Unless this is a homework assignment, use std::merge

void merge( 
    unsigned combo[], 
    const unsigned a[],
    unsigned aElements,
    const unsigned b[],
    unsigned bElements 
){
    std::merge(a, a+aElements, b, b+bElemnts, combo);
}

If this is homework, try this algorithm:

index_result = 0; index_a = 0; index_b = 0;
while(index_a < size_a && index_b < size_b)
  if(a[index_a] < b[index_b])
    result[index_result++] = a[index_a++]
  else
    result[index_result++] = b[index_b++]
while(index_a < size_a)
  result[index_result++] = a[index_a++]
whle(index_b < size_b)
  result[index_result++] = b[index_b++]
share|improve this answer
    
This is a homework assignment. I can write the function any way I'd like but the function prototypes must be the same. –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:28
    
@user1681673 Ouch! That's a horrible function prototype to get for an assignment. –  juanchopanza Feb 14 '13 at 23:30
    
Yeah, it's strange. All the prototypes are very similar to this one. –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:31

I assume that this is some type of homework, if it is not, just use std::merge.

If you want to roll this out manually you need to consider that you are working with three cursors: two are input cursors into the two different arrays and the other one is the output (write) cursor.

After deciding from which of the arrays you want to move the next element, you need to copy and update two cursors, the read cursor in that array (since that element has already been consumed) and the write cursor in the final array (since that location has already been written to).

I hope this is enough to lead you to a solution :)

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Here's a list of standard things you could try: http://www.cplusplus.com/faq/sequences/sequencing/sort-algorithms/

Also, have you considered something like, in psuedo-code:

create a new array [size of old array minus one] mempcy(new array, start to removal point -1) mempcy(new array, removal point + 1 to end)

sort from new array

fine the lowest number again...

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I don't think I'm allowed to do it that way. The array elements must be put in the new array in order from lowest to highest. Thanks for the help. I'll check out the link. –  user1681673 Feb 14 '13 at 23:29
    
That link is much what we covered in advanced C++ a long time ago, so it will (I guess) be acceptable to your instructor. –  user1833028 Feb 14 '13 at 23:32

Assuming this is for a homework assignment or something similar, and that you're not allowed to use standard stuff like std::merge, the merge algorithms for 2 sorted lists can be accomplished in linear complexity like so:

void merge( unsigned combo[], const unsigned a[], unsigned aElements, const unsigned 
b[],    unsigned bElements ){

    if (mySort(a, aElements) == 0) {
        cout << "The first array is not sorted";
        exit(1);
    }

    if (mySort(b, bElements) == 0) {
        cout << "The second array is not sorted";
        exit(1);
    }

    int i,j,k =0;
    while (i<aElements && j<bElements)
    {
        if (a[i]<=b[j])
        {
            combo[j++]=a[i++];
        } else
        {
            combo[j++]=b[j++];
        }
    }

    //add remaining elements. at least one of these loops will not happen
    while (i < aElements) combo[j++]=a[i++];
    while (j < bElements) combo[j++]=b[j++];
}
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