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I want to compute the union of the keys of two hashmaps. I wrote the following code (MWE below), but I

get UnsupportedOperationException. What would be a good of accomplishing this?

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;


public class AddAll {

    public static void main(String args[]){

        Map<String, Integer> first = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        Map<String, Integer> second = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

        first.put("First", 1);
        second.put("Second", 2);

        Set<String> one = first.keySet();
        Set<String> two = second.keySet();

        Set<String> union = one;
        union.addAll(two);

        System.out.println(union);


    }


}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, union is not a copy of one, it is one. It is first.keySet(). And first.keySet() isn't a copy of the keys of first, it's a view, and won't support adds, as documented in Map.keySet().

So you need to actually do a copy. The simplest way is probably to write

 one = new HashSet<String>(first);

which uses the "copy constructor" of HashSet to do an actual copy, instead of just referring to the same object.

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Thank you. That was informative and exactly what I needed. –  B M Feb 15 '13 at 0:34

Use below code instead

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;


public class AddAll {

    public static void main(String args[]){

        Map<String, Integer> first = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        Map<String, Integer> second = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        Map<String, Integer> union = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
        first.put("First", 1);
        second.put("Second", 2);
        union.putAll(first);
        union.putAll(second);

        System.out.println(union);
        System.out.println(union.keySet());


    }


}
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Remember the keySet is the actual data of the map, it's not a copy. If it let you call addAll there, you'd be dumping all those keys into the first map with no values! The HashMap purposely only allows you to add new mappings by using the put type methods of the actual map.

You want union to be an actual new set probably, not the backing data of the first hashmapL

    Set<String> one = first.keySet();
    Set<String> two = second.keySet();

    Set<String> union = new HashSet<String>(one);
    union.addAll(two);
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