Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How to find the predecessor of a given number from a given array of numbers? For example, if the given array contains -2,1,0,3
and the input number is 0, then the predecessor is -2.

I wrote the following code:

public static int getPredecessor(int[] inpArr, int key) {
    int minDiff = key<=0 ? (key-inpArr[0]) : key;
    int predecessor = key;
    for(int i=0;i<inpArr.length;i++) {
        if(inpArr[i] < key && (key - inpArr[i])<=minDiff)
        {
            minDiff = key - inpArr[i];
            predecessor = inpArr[i];
        }   
    }
    return predecessor;
}

What I have done is basically keep track of the minimum difference between the supplied number and each number in the array; whenever the minimum difference is encountered, that particular number in the array is stored as the predecessor. If the final return statement is going to return the same number as the input number, then it means no predecessor was found in the given array.

My question is:
can the code be optimized in any way? It runs in O(n) time and O(1) space complexities.

share|improve this question
3  
if the array is sorted, you can do better than O(n). – jtahlborn Feb 15 '13 at 2:23
    
@Dave nope, he is talking about values. Which value is the first item before it when sorted. – yem yem yen Feb 15 '13 at 2:25
    
Ah, I get it... – Dave Newton Feb 15 '13 at 2:25
3  
I don't think you can optimize this without special assumptions, like sorted array, but you should handle the case when key == inpArr[0]. I think this version will end up returning key. – Krzysztof Kozielczyk Feb 15 '13 at 2:45
    
@KrzysztofKozielczyk: cleverly spotted. I've edited the code. – codewarrior Feb 15 '13 at 3:00

For a single query on an unsorted array (as the example array is), O(N) time is the best that could be achieved because there must inevitably be a comparison with every element in the array.

Sorting the array first will cost O(N log N) time but, if many queries on the array are expected, each query could then be done by binary search in O(log N) time. Thus, the average cost of a query could be lower than O(N), if there are enough queries.

Alternatively, if many queries are expected to use the same small(ish) set of key values, memo-izing the result for each key using, for instance, a hash table would eventually provide an average O(1) performance per query at the cost of O(N) space.

share|improve this answer
    
That was very insightful. thanks! – codewarrior Feb 15 '13 at 2:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code above doesn't work for cases like inpArr=[-5,-2] and key=-4, inpArr=[-5,-2,-3], key=+1. So corrected it. Here's the corrected code.

public static int getPredecessorv2(int[] inpArr, int key) {
    int minDiff = Math.abs(key);
    int pred = key;
    if(inpArr[0] < key) {
        minDiff = key - inpArr[0];
        pred = inpArr[0];
    } 
    for(int i=0;i<inpArr.length;i++) {
        if(inpArr[i] < key && (key - inpArr[i])<=minDiff)
        {
            minDiff = key - inpArr[i];
            pred = inpArr[i];
        }   
    }
    return pred;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.