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Eclipse(Juno) says there is a resource leak warnings in this sample. Is this valid?
This is occurred when the exception throwing point is in the for loop.

package kuni;

import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class ResourceWarn {
    public static void main(String[] args){

        try {
            FileWriter f = null;
            try{
                f = new FileWriter("test.txt");
                for(String s : Arrays.asList("a","b","c")){
                    if(s.equals("c"))throw new RuntimeException("aa"); //resource leak warn here
                    f.write(s);
                }
            }finally{
                try{
                    f.close();
                }catch(Exception ignore){
                }
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the exact error message? – Code-Apprentice Feb 15 '13 at 2:40
    
Resource leak: 'f' is not closed at this location – user2074126 Apr 9 '14 at 8:33

I think I know what Eclipse is complaining about.

        } finally {
            try {
                System.err.println("closing f");
                f.close();
            } catch(Exception ignore) {
            }
        }

The problem is the println !!!

Eclipse thinks that it is possible that the System.err.println(...) call could throw an exception. If that were to happen, then the f.close() call wouldn't happen .... ergo, a leak.

You and I know that this "can't happen" ... but the Eclipse code analyser probably doesn't understand the special nature of System.err.

And besides, it is possible that somewhere else in the code we've done something that would cause System.err.println(...) to fail; e.g. we might have used System.setErr(...) to replace the normal System.err instance with an instance of some custom PrintWriter subclass that throws an unchecked exception on the 2nd Tuesday of every month.

Try removing the println or moving it after the close call.

share|improve this answer

No, you don't have a resource leak there. I don't know what eclipse is complaining of.

The only comments I have regarding your code are:

  1. It will be easier to read if you include spaces between keywords and opening/closing braces.

  2. You shouldn't throw away the IOException in the finally block, rather you should log it and continue (as you currently do). There are weird bugs that happen when cleanup code throws exceptions and logging religiously will save you extremely painful debugging sessions.

  3. For a demo like this, printing the stack trace is fine, but in general you should be logging it, and only printing a short error message to stderr. Users panic when they see stacktraces, even when benign.

Other than that, the code looks good to me, and none of the above suggest a resource leak.

share|improve this answer

When you throw a new RuntimeException, you are immediately lead to the catch block without having a chance to close your FileWriter. You need to close your FileWriter in the case a RuntimeException is thrown.

public static void main(String[] arg) {
    FileWriter f = null;
    try {
        f = new FileWriter("test.txt");
        for (String s : Arrays.asList("a", "b", "c")) {
            if (s.equals("c"))
                throw new RuntimeException("aa"); // resource leak warn here
            f.write(s);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            if (f != null) {
                f.close();
            }
        } catch (Exception ignore) {
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
On the contrary, he is using a try/finally statement inside a try/catch statement. So the file will be closed. There isn't a resource leak; and, in a non-trivial example, keeping the file cleanup closer to the file usage is a non-trivial advantage over your recommendation. – Recurse Feb 15 '13 at 2:46
    
this is good readable, the OP with nested try catch us a bit ugly – AlexWien Feb 15 '13 at 3:16

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