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C++

Is it better to update the value of a pointer or to change the pointer to point to something else?

Let's say we have two classes: ball and coordinates.

class ball
{
    Coordinates *ballCurrent;
    public:
        ball(int);
        ~ball();
        void setLoc(Coordinates&); // OR void setLoc(int, int);
};

class Coordinates
{
    int x, y;
    public:
        Coordinates(int, int);
        void setCoordinates(int, int);
};

For the setLoc method in the ball class, which parameters should is better? Would it be better to just setLoc by using (*ballCurrent).setCoordinates(int, int) OR by using (ballCurrent).setLoc((new Coordinates(int, int)))? Please go into detail the reason for each case if possible.

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Why create another object when there is an existing one? –  Mark Garcia Feb 15 '13 at 5:03
    
I kind of wanted to know when it was better to use each case. –  dalawh Feb 15 '13 at 5:04
2  
and Coordinates needs to be a pointer? –  billz Feb 15 '13 at 5:05
    
It doesn't have to. Is using pointers better or just using a variable? –  dalawh Feb 15 '13 at 5:06
3  
using variable is better, don't use pointer unless you have to. Use smart pointer instead of raw pointers –  billz Feb 15 '13 at 5:07

5 Answers 5

Is it better to update the value of a pointer or to change the pointer to point to something else?

That's not the sort of question that can be answered without some context. It's often useful to know that an object is immutable -- that as long as you have a pointer to that object, the object won't change under your nose. For example, if a function or method takes a pointer to an immutable type as a parameter, you know that you can pass objects to that function without worrying that the function will change the object.

On the other hand, mutable objects also have their place. For one thing, you sometimes want to be able to build an object up in several steps rather than doing it all at once, and you may not want to have to create several intermediate objects along the way just to get to the final object.

So, it depends on context. I see that you've provided a simple example, but I don't think there's necessarily a correct answer even for your example. It depends on what's important to you and how the objects in question will interact with other parts of the system. I'd lean toward mutable objects, I think, because in a game it's likely that several objects will need to know about the ball. If the only way to move the ball is to create a new ball and pass it around to all the other objects that care about it, well, that could easily get to be a huge problem. The coordinates object could easily be immutable, though -- anyone who needs to know the location of the ball should ask the ball for it's location. Once they get it, they'll probably expect the location not to change every few milliseconds. If you don't make the coordinates object immutable, the other way to handle that problem is for the ball to make a copy of its location whenever someone asks, and hand out that copy instead of returning a pointer to its own location object.

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I might write this way if I could:

class ball
{
    Coordinates coordinate_;     // better name than ballCurrent?
    public:
        explicit ball(int)       // add explicit to avoid implicit converting
        : coordinate_(0,0)       // initialize corrdinate_ properly
        {
        }
        ~ball();
        void setLoc(const Coordinates& co) // add const
        {
           coordinate_ = co;
        }

        void setLoc(int x, int y)
        {
           coordinate_.setCoordinates(x,y);
        }
};

No need to worry about dynamic memory issue, could setLoc in two ways by function overloading. No wild pointer, no worries.

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If you use a new object, it will need memory allocated for itself, and it will also need to be initialized (constructor/s run, properties assigned, etc). That is a lot of overhead compared to just change the value of an object you already have (and that you created for that very purpose).

Besides, if you create a new object, you need to free the memory of your previous pointer, which again is overhead... so just change your existing object.

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Just change the values of the object that is being pointed to. It doesn't make sense to create a whole new object every time you want to update a value.

One situation where you might have to create a whole new object rather just change the values is if Coordinates had a const x and y value and there was no setCoordinates function. But then that's mostly likely a poor design decision if you are needing to be update the co-ordinates often.

Also rather than this:

(*ballCurrent).setCoordinates(int, int);

you can use this:

ballCurrent->setCoordinate(int, int);

Which does the same thing but is just easier to write and a lot of people will find it more readable.

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In the case of SetLoc(int,int), you are creating a dependency between ball and Coordinates on the Coordinates constructor, and more importantly, on what it represents. If the constructor signature changes, you will have to carry these changes over to ball::SetLoc. This argument is valid in the general case, where you really want to avoid passing along a set of parameters to initialize an object component.

In this particular case, Coordinates embodies an position in space, and probably should come with a set of methods to manipulate it, in order to preserve its implementation details from pervading the rest of the programme. If you wish to move to a 3D coordinate system, ideally, all you would have to change are the constructors invocations and the class implementation. So you really want to reduce the necessary changes outside the class to a minimum, which means avoiding the issue explained earlier.

You present two different solutions to set the location of the ball object. In practice would these solutions appear? In a trivial programme, where the ball position hardcoded, that is a possibility, and either solution could work. But in a more sophisticated software, the ball position would probably be initially set by a configuration file, and any subsequent update of the position done after some non trivial computation. In this situation, it much more maintainable to encapsulate all the logic pertaining to coordinates in the class, and avoid the (int, int) parameter passing.

If you are concerned by memory allocation overheads (e.g. temporaries generated by function returned results), there are ways to alleviate them by using wisely consts, references, or even pointers, and define sensible copy constructors.

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