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I have a generic list List<String, String> ListName

I am trying to insert the values of the list, into a dictionary Dictionary<String, int>

I looked at places but only found adding elements of dictionary to list. While my requirement is opposite. I tried using toDictionary, but it didnt work for me. Not sure what went wrong.

Have anyone every attempted inserting values from list to dictionary?

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Please show some code. –  Simon Whitehead Feb 15 '13 at 5:04
2  
Which List takes two type parameters? Where does the int come from? –  Eric J. Feb 15 '13 at 5:05
    
The list is generic, and reads a file which contains three fields, and one of them is int. so attempt here is to use a string column and the int column as key and value. –  SonalKhodiyar Feb 15 '13 at 5:07
1  
The BCL generic List is defined as List<T>, not List<T,U>. So you could not make a List<string,string> using the BCL. We cannot see howyou are storing the three fields from the file. Please show some code. –  Eric J. Feb 15 '13 at 5:10
    
Show some code of what you are trying. –  Igoy Feb 15 '13 at 5:10
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3 Answers

I assume you mean List<string[]> because I have never seen a generic List<T,WhoAmI> before

If you are using List<string[]> you can use the ToDictionary function

List<string[]> ListName = new List<string[]>();
ListName.Add(new[] { "Stack", "1" });
ListName.Add(new[] { "Overflow", "2" });

// Select the first string([0]) as the key, and parse the 2nd([1]) as int
Dictionary<string,int> result = ListName.ToDictionary(key => key[0], value => int.Parse(value[1]));

if you are using some kind of custom object in your list you can also do it the same way

List<MyObject<string, string>> ListName = new List<MyObject<string, string>>();
Dictionary<string, int> result = ListName.ToDictionary(key => key.String1, value => int.Parse(value.String2));


public class MyObject<T, U>
{
    public MyObject(T string1, U string2)
    {
        String1 = string1;
        String2 = string2;
    }

    public T String1 { get; set; }
    public U String2 { get; set; }
}

Note: You should add error checking around the int.Parse or use Int.TryParse if there is a chance it may not be a number.

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my code is pretty much like sa_ddam213 mentioned List<MyObject<string, string>> ListName = new List<MyObject<string, string>>(); Dictionary<string, int> result = ListName.ToDictionary(key => key.String1, value => int.Parse(value.String2)); public class MyObject<T, U> { public MyObject(T string1, U string2, int v) { String1 = string1; String2 = string2; } public T String1 { get; set; } public U String2 { get; set; } } –  SonalKhodiyar Feb 15 '13 at 6:02
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I'm not sure exactly where the integer is coming from, but something like this should work:

Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();
list.ForEach(x => dict.Add(x, theInteger));
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You can use like that:

List<KeyValuePair<String, String>> ListName = new List<KeyValuePair<String, String>>();
Dictionary<String, Int32> dict = new Dictionary<String, Int32>();
ListName.ForEach(e=> dict.Add(e.key, Int32.Parse(e.Value)));
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