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I have a ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor with which I schedule a task to run at a fixed rate. I want the task to be running with a specified delay for a maximum of say 10 times until it "succeeds". After that, I will not want the task to be retried. So basically I'll need to stop running the scheduled task when I want it to be stopped, but without shutting down the ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor. Any idea how I'd do that?

Here's some pseudocode -

public class ScheduledThreadPoolExecutorTest
{
  public static ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor executor = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(15);  // no multiple instances, just one to serve all requests

  class MyTask implements Runnable
  {
    private int MAX_ATTEMPTS = 10;
    public void run()
    {
      if(++attempt <= MAX_ATTEMPTS)
      {
        doX();
        if(doXSucceeded)
        {
          //stop retrying the task anymore
        }
      }
      else
      { 
        //couldn't succeed in MAX attempts, don't bother retrying anymore!
      }
    }
  }

  public void main(String[] args)
  {
    executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutorTest().new MyTask(), 0, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

run this test, it prints 1 2 3 4 5 and stops

public class ScheduledThreadPoolExecutorTest {
    static ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor executor = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(15); // no
    static ScheduledFuture<?> t;

    static class MyTask implements Runnable {
        private int attempt = 1;

        public void run() {
            System.out.print(attempt + " ");
            if (++attempt > 5) {
                t.cancel(false);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        t = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new MyTask(), 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    }
}
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Perfect thanks! I did know about the scheduledfuture but I was trying to use this way: t = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new MyTask(), 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS); t.cancel(true); which would never have worked for obvious reasons. Canceling the task inside the task implementation seems about right. –  mystarrocks Feb 15 '13 at 6:33

Nicely cancelled outside of thread:

public class ScheduleTest {

    @Test
    public void testCancel() throws Exception {
        final ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor EXECUTOR = (ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor) Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(2);
        ScheduledFuture f1 = EXECUTOR.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                System.out.println("Im alive 1");
            }
        }, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
        ScheduledFuture f2 = EXECUTOR.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                System.out.println("Im alive 2");
            }
        }, 0, 2, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

        Thread.sleep(10000);
        f1.cancel(true);
        System.out.println("f1 cancel");
        Thread.sleep(10000);
        f2.cancel(false);
        System.out.println("f2 cancel");
        Thread.sleep(10000);
    }
}

Sometimes thread couldn't be cancelled, this solved usually via volatile boolean isCancelled;

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