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I want to import a very large sql file into my test db server, the file is around 50GB. The problem is if I do mysql -uuser -p < sqlfile.sql, it is going to take very looong time due to the file loading time itself.

So I would like to split the files into very small chunks 100MB or so using split -bytes=100M but the problem is the split wont be SQL statement aligned (broken insert statements spanning file boundaries).

Now my question is, is there any way to stream multiple files in commandline? something like

mysql -user -p <1.sql < 2.sql < 3.sql and so on, if that is possible will I be able to do some shell scripting-fu to use xargs and for loop to do this for all files in a directory?

EDIT: My attempt to split files is governed by this post, How to import LARGE sql files into mysql table. It seems the problem is same as that of mine. Well, the test server is 8 GB, Xeon Quadcore, and I tried the same in another server, with 20 Core 144GB, and it got finished fine with 11hr runtime (shared one with lots of CPU/RAM intensive jobs going on...). The test server, the process is not complete yet complete. So I guess it is the RAM+File loading overhead. Correct me if I am wrong.

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Why does it matter if you do it all at once or not? It needs to get done eventually, right? –  Explosion Pills Feb 15 '13 at 6:21
    
11 hours for 50GB files?? Could you please post your mycnf.conf. Also there is no issue with importing large files: nohup mysql -A {credentials + database if needed} < file.sql & –  ravnur Feb 15 '13 at 7:52
    
try to set larger values for max_allowed_packet and read_buffer_size variables in config file –  vadchen Feb 15 '13 at 7:57
    
@ravnur There is no change in my.cnf, other than changing /var/lib/mysql to /mysqldatadir/ –  Aczire Feb 15 '13 at 8:04
    
@vadchen as per my understanding, packet size is for more lengthy statements, right? Will try increasing read_buffer_size –  Aczire Feb 15 '13 at 8:05
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1 Answer

The problem is if I do mysql -uuser -p < sqlfile.sql, it is going to take very looong time due to the file loading time itself.

There's no "loading time" when you redirect a file like that. MySQL can read the file as fast as it likes; there's no overhead. Splitting the file up is not going to give you any kind of speedup. This is as fast as it gets.

Now my question is, is there any way to stream multiple files in commandline?

It's going to be slower than leaving the file in one big piece, but if you really want to you can do it:

cat 1.sql 2.sql 3.sql | mysql -uuser -p

Or alternatively you can run mysql separately for each file:

for file in *.sql; do mysql -uuser -p < "$file"; done
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Yup, cat is what I too first thought. But wont work. Consider SELECT table_schema "DB Name", sum( data_length + index_length ) / 1024 / 1024 "DB Size in MB" FROM inf in 1.sql and ormation_schema.TABLES GROUP BY table_schema; in 2.sql. Te command will fail saying incorrect statement. But I wonder why! –  Aczire Feb 15 '13 at 9:07
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