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I'm trying to compare keys of two objects, values of properties don't matter.

var obj1 = {
    foo: {
        abc: "foo.abc",
    },
    bar: {
        aaa: {
            bbb: "bar.aaa.bbb" // <-- difference
        }
    }
};

var obj2 = {
    foo: {
        abc: "foo.abc",
    },
    bar: {
        aaa: {
            ccc: "bar.aaa.ccc" // <-- difference
        }
    }
};
// function should return true if properties are identical, false otherwise
function compareObjProps(obj1, obj2) {
    for(var prop in obj1) {

        // when comparing bar.aaa.bbb and bar.aaa.ccc
        // this does get logged, but the function doesn't return false
        if(!obj2.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            console.log("mismatch found");
            return false;
        }

        if(typeof(obj1[prop]) === "object") {
            compareObjProps(obj1[prop], obj2[prop]);
        }
    }

    // this always returns
    return true;
}

It seems that return false does not return from the top level function, but the recursive one.

So how can I return false when the whole matching function is done executing?

share|improve this question
    
How do you know it diesn't return false? do you evalute the return value? –  CloudyMarble Feb 15 '13 at 6:45
    
@MeNoMore var result = compareObjPros(obj1, obj2); console.log(result); always true... –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 6:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're missing a return:

    if(typeof(obj1[prop]) === "object"
        && !compareObjProps(obj1[prop], obj2[prop]))
    {
       return false;
    }

Otherwise the result of recursive calls are going to be completely ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean that return should happen when recursive call returns false (see edit)... –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 15 '13 at 6:46
    
@AlexeiLevenkov: Yes. I was actually thinking in terms of a path instead of a property tree. Thanks for the edit. –  Zeta Feb 15 '13 at 6:47
    
nah...none of your first or edited version returns false. true still... am I doing anything wrong? –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 6:49
    
oops...my bad, the edited version works. –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 7:11

Try this:

function compareObjProps(obj1, obj2) {
    var result = true;
    for (var prop in obj1) {
        if (obj1.hasOwnProperty(prop) && !obj2.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            console.log("mismatch found");
            result = false;
        } else if (typeof(obj1[prop]) === "object") {
            result = compareObjProps(obj1[prop], obj2[prop]);
        }

        if (!result) {
            break;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/gSYfy/4/

share|improve this answer
    
That worked. I was doing the same by adding a variable to track the result, but didn't succeed. Thanks lan. –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 6:57
    
@user1643156 Awesome, glad it worked/helped. Make sure you test it to verify it works fully, although it seems fine. Let me know if you encounter anything! –  Ian Feb 15 '13 at 6:59
    
sorry lan but I had to take Zeta's answer as accepted since it doesn't require an extra variable. thanks anyway. –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 7:22
    
@user1643156 No problem. I'm not sure it would be a good solution if you ever wanted to expand this recursion to do more, but as long as you got something to work, that's great! –  Ian Feb 15 '13 at 7:30

Yes, a function A called by function B cannot tell B to return. Some people have suggested returning the result of the recursive call, but that wouldn't give you the right result, as it would cause the program to return whether the first sub-object it found was identical, and not if all the objects are identical. I suggest you make this modification:

if(typeof(obj1[prop]) === "object") {
   if(!compareObjProps(obj1[prop], obj2[prop])){
      return false;
   }
}

This will make your program propagate a "false" as you wanted, but make it keep going if the result was "true".

share|improve this answer
    
HEYHEYHEY...who downvoted this answer? there might be something improper in the explanation. but the code it does work! –  user1643156 Feb 15 '13 at 7:05

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