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Just curious if this is the way to do this, just want to make sure its not leaking, although I would think I am only modifying the string contents.

NSMutableString *newPath = [[NSMutableString alloc] init];

for(fileName in [manager enumeratorAtPath:rootPath]){
    if ([[fileName pathExtension] isEqual:@"exr"]) {
        [fileArray addObject:fileName];

        // THIS BIT	
        [newPath setString:rootPath];
        [newPath appendString:@"/"];
        [newPath appendString:fileName];
        // HERE
        attrDir = [manager attributesOfItemAtPath:newPath error:&myError];

        fileSize = [attrDir objectForKey: @"NSFileSize"];
        NSLog(@"File: /%@ Size: %@", fileName, fileSize);
    }
}
[newPath release];

gary

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This looks fine leak-wise. If you're running Xcode 3.2 you can Build->Build & Analyzer to get Clang to check this sort of thing.

Remember you only have to release things you alloc, new, copy or retain.

Consider using stringByAppendingPathComponent, rather than hardcoding the @"/" path separator. NSString has a number of methods like this specifically for working with paths.

NSString* fullPath = [rootPath stringByAppendingPathComponent:fileName];
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Hmm I tried adding [newPath stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"/"]; to test adding a "/" to the end, but I can't seem to get it working ... –  fuzzygoat Sep 28 '09 at 21:22
    
stringByAppendingPathComponent avoids you having to know about the delimiter. I've updated the answer to reflect the usage. –  nall Sep 28 '09 at 21:39
    
thank you, so how does it know what to add? –  fuzzygoat Sep 28 '09 at 21:44
1  
which delimiter to add? that's operating system dependent. which path component to add? you'd have to supply that. it's whatever would go "after" the path delimiter. –  nall Sep 28 '09 at 21:54
    
go it, thank you –  fuzzygoat Sep 28 '09 at 22:02

There is absolutely nothing wrong with your code, it is correct memory management.

But it can be done with even less code and memory management needed:

for(fileName in [manager enumeratorAtPath:rootPath]){
  if ([[fileName pathExtension] isEqualToString:@"exr"]) {
    [fileArray addObject:fileName];

    NSString* newPath = [rootPath stringByAppendingPathComponent:fileName];
    attrDir = [manager attributesOfItemAtPath:newPath error:&myError];

    fileSize = [attrDir objectForKey: @"NSFileSize"];
    NSLog(@"File: /%@ Size: %@", fileName, fileSize);
  }
}
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Thank you, much appreciated. –  fuzzygoat Sep 29 '09 at 20:45

There's nothing wrong with it, although it could be better to use initWithFormat and release:

NSString *newPath = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@/%@",rootPath,fileName];

// do your thing

[newPath release];
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1  
Not mentioned but important: That would go inside the loop. –  Chuck Sep 28 '09 at 19:56
    
Thank you, coming from procedural programming I am always a little cautious of declaring variables on demand (i.e. not at the start of a block) I guess I just need to be a little more flexible with a more open view with regards to Objective-C –  fuzzygoat Sep 28 '09 at 21:00
2  
In fact, there are very good reasons for declaring variables in the most enclosing scope possible (i.e. closest to where they are used). –  nall Sep 28 '09 at 21:41
    
You really should use the path specific methods on NSString to work with paths. Otherwise you can get into trouble if directories have, or do not have, trailing '/', and some other corner cases. Look at the documentation for NSString and the methods under the "Working With Paths" task group. As a bonus you get to write less code. –  PeyloW Sep 29 '09 at 14:52

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