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Is this singleton design pattern correct ? I mean what's the need of checking the object is null or not when it's static and the method is synchronized .

public class MySingleton {

    int val = 10;
    private static final MySingleton singleton = new MySingleton();

    private MySingleton() { }

    public static synchronized MySingleton getSingleton() {
        return singleton;
    }
}
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You don't need to make your method synchronized. The fact that the variable is initialized in a static initializer is enough. Also, your val variable should almost certainly be private...

The double-checked locking pattern (with the nullity checking) is usually used when you don't want a synchronized method and you don't want a static initializer. (To my mind it's unnecessarily complex and brittle in almost all cases.)

Another option would be to use an enum:

public enum MySingleton {
    INSTANCE;

    private int val = 10;

    // Presumably something to use val
}

Using an enum enforces the singleton-ness and even gets it right in the face of serialization. It's also a pretty simple way of doing it with no actual code :) On the other hand, it's never felt entirely right to me...

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Regarding the synchronized keyword , I have another doubt ,are static variable or methods thread safe ? I googled a bit and I got first impression that they aren't , thay's why I used synchronized. – Praveen Kumar Feb 15 '13 at 9:02
2  
@Praveen Kumar, By the method getSingleton() is called, the singleton object is created.Since it's already created no need for synchronization. – Jagannath Feb 15 '13 at 9:18

You can do it like that, but in many cases you can use "lazy evaluation" - you create the instance the first time it is requested:

public class MySingleton {

    private static MySingleton singleton = null

    private MySingleton() { }

    public static synchronized MySingleton getSingleton() {
        if (singleton == null) {
            singleton = new MySingleton();
        }
        return singleton;
    }
}
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2  
It's worth noting that unless you have other static methods which you want to be able to run without creating the instance, it's fine to just use the static initializer - it's still lazy until the class is first used. – Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 8:35

The best pattern is the one given by Joshua Bloch in his book Effective Java, using an Enum :

public enum MySingleton {
    INSTANCE;

    public void doSomething() {

    }
}

Quoting the book :

"This approach is functionally equivalent to the public field approach, except that it is more concise, provides the serialization machinery for free, and provides an ironclad guarantee against multiple instantiation, even in the face of sophisticated serialization or reflection attacks. While this approach has yet to be widely adopted, a single-element enum type is the best way to implement a singleton."

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Hello overmeulen. Your answer doesn't contribute much, because you don't say why this pattern is the "best". To improve your answer you could write a bit about its advantages and disadvantages and why it is preferable to OPs method. – Philipp Feb 15 '13 at 8:37
    
I edited my answer – overmeulen Feb 15 '13 at 8:43

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