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How do I create a method that takes as a variable the object that it's called upon...

For example in "Hello".to_s, .to_s takes "Hello" as argument.

EDIT:

Thank you for answering my question!

For anyone wondering how to do this, here's an example:

  def double
    self*2
  end

  2.double
  =>4

Thanks again

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2  
Why do you want to do that? That totally defeats the purpose of OOP in Ruby. –  Waseem Feb 15 '13 at 8:53
    
I don't know, it's very commonly done.. and I'm curious as to how it's done. –  Abram Feb 15 '13 at 8:54
    
...and I don't really see what you mean. –  Abram Feb 15 '13 at 8:55
    
I don't see what you mean. "Hello" is not a variable. –  sawa Feb 15 '13 at 9:20
    
His question is pretty simple to understand... He just would like to know how "Hello".to_s call the "to_s" method with "Hello" as an argument. The fact that in this case "Hello" is not a "variable" is just not obvious for a newbie to Ruby. –  ByScripts Feb 15 '13 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in your exemple, in to_s body you can refer to "Hello" using self. If that's not what you're asking, you need to describe a bit better your problem.

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I believe that this is proper solution. But I also think that @Waseem is right; this defeats purpose of OOP in Ruby. –  Oto Brglez Feb 15 '13 at 8:56
    
This question might be influenced by python, where self is the first parameter of any method (if I remember correctly, tell me if I'm wrong). –  ksol Feb 15 '13 at 8:58
    
Thanks for that. Exactly what I wanted. –  Abram Feb 15 '13 at 20:56

You need to open the class and extend it.

class String
  def i_love
    "I love #{self}"
  end
end

"Pizza".i_love
=> "I love Pizza"
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Thank you for your answer. Upvote! –  Abram Feb 15 '13 at 21:07

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