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Let's say I have this class:

class Foo {
public:
   void member(std::string s);
   void member(int64_t &n);
};

Now I want to do some thing like

int64_t value = 5;
Foo f;
f.member(value);

The problem is that the compiler (at least GCC) gets confused & believes I'm trying to call member with a string using the char* constructor:

invalid conversion from 'int64_t' to 'const char*

How could I go about calling the actual member function I want without changing the method signature? Are templates the only solution? I have tried casting without any help (which shouldn't matter since the type is already unambiguous).


Sorry - found the mistake.

The declaration was:

class Foo {
public:
    void member(std::string s);
    void member(int64_t &n);
};

Removing the by-ref solved it.

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2  
I can't reproduce the error with GCC 3.3, 4.2, or 4.4 on Ubuntu nor with GCC 3.4 on Solaris 10. –  Nathan Kitchen Sep 28 '09 at 20:21
    
You're correct - for some reason, my attempts to reduce to a simple case failed. It was a compiler error with my actual code though - maybe I missed something else. –  Vitali Sep 28 '09 at 22:19
    
Now with the change to int64_t& it doesn't make sense to me anymore why it should fail to compile. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 28 '09 at 22:22

3 Answers 3

Cast the argument to exactly match the argument type of the overload you want:

f.member((int64_t) value);
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That's redundant if you are already passing a variable with the correct type. –  Vitali Sep 28 '09 at 20:23
    
That won't work because he has a non-const reference parameter, though. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 28 '09 at 20:25
    
@unknown: But he is not passing the correct type. The parameter should be int64_t he is passing uint64_t –  Loki Astari Sep 28 '09 at 20:37
    
Sorry - typo in the description. That should have been int64_t. –  Vitali Sep 28 '09 at 22:01

Sorry - found the mistake.

The declaration was:

class Foo {
public:
   void member(std::string s);
   void member(int64_t &n);
};

Removing the by-ref solved it.

share|improve this answer
1  
You changed the method signature which you said you didn't want to do... ah well –  fbrereto Sep 28 '09 at 20:56
    
Yeah, I guess. I was thinking more along the lines of changing the function name. It's still unclear to me why the compiler was getting confused (only in my code - my attempts to reduce the code to an example failed). –  Vitali Sep 28 '09 at 22:04

There may be easier ways to solve this (like with a parameter cast) but I have seen solutions that look like the following:

void (Foo::*memberProc)(int64_t) = &Foo::member;

Foo f;
((f).*(memberProc))(5);

Convoluted, yes, but it's explicit.

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Ugly. I would sooner slit my wrists than use such a solution. –  C Johnson Jun 15 '10 at 16:02

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