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I wrote an activity with ViewPager, which gets populated after an AsyncTask is executed. Each TestDataObject is tied to the relevant TestFragment. When the screen is rotated the application crushes due to a NullPointerException inside onCreateView method. I believe this is because of ViewPager/Adapter onSaveInstanceState methods, onCreateView tries to restore data prior to the AsyncTask data load when data isn't available yet.

I could just if onCreateView code but it doesn't feel to me like a right solution, because amount of fragments inside ViewPager might vary so it might end up doing unnecessary job: restore altered viewpager content and then replace with initial. In this case onSaveInstanceState seems to be excessively harmful. Presumably, I could extend ViewPager or Adapter to cancel save procedure - I find it weird as well.

Do you have any better suggestions to offer?

public class MainActivity extends LoggerActivity {

    private ArrayList<TestDataObject> mDataObjects = new ArrayList<MainActivity.TestDataObject>();

    private ViewPager mViewPager;
    private TestFragmentAdapter mViewPagerAdapter;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        mViewPager = (ViewPager) findViewById(R.id.pager);
        mViewPagerAdapter = new TestFragmentAdapter(
                getSupportFragmentManager(), mDataObjects);
        mViewPager.setAdapter(mViewPagerAdapter);
        new TestAsyncTask().execute();
    }

    private class TestAsyncTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {
        @Override
        protected Void doInBackground(Void... params) {
            try {
                TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(3);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(Void result) {
            super.onPostExecute(result);
            mDataObjects.add(new TestDataObject());
            mDataObjects.add(new TestDataObject());
            mDataObjects.add(new TestDataObject());
            mViewPagerAdapter.notifyDataSetChanged();

        }
    }

    public static class TestFragment extends Fragment {

        private TestDataObject mDataObject;

        public static TestFragment getInstance(TestDataObject obj) {
            TestFragment f = new TestFragment();
            f.mDataObject = obj;
            return f;
        }

        @Override
        public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
                Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            // layout.find...
            mDataObject.toString();
            return inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_test, null, false);
        }

    }

    public static class TestFragmentAdapter extends FragmentStatePagerAdapter {

        private List<TestDataObject> mDataObjects;

        public TestFragmentAdapter(FragmentManager fm, List<TestDataObject> objs) {
            super(fm);
            mDataObjects = objs;
        }

        @Override
        public Fragment getItem(int position) {
            return TestFragment.getInstance(mDataObjects.get(position));
        }

        @Override
        public int getCount() {
            return mDataObjects == null ? 0 : mDataObjects.size();
        }

    }

    public static class TestDataObject {
    }
}
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I guess you need to add some part of the code which are required to understand the code such as onSavedInstance method. –  Saeid Farivar Feb 15 '13 at 11:23
    
there's nothing I do with onSaveInstanceState. Its the component itself who tries to save current view state. I should probably look into stackoverflow.com/questions/9735514/… –  midnight Feb 15 '13 at 13:43
    
there are different ways to persist the state (rotation is just one example that you need persisting the state). one way is with implementing the onSaveInstanceState and retrieving the data later. other way is just the way your link suggests which is not as flexible as implementing your own onSaveInstanceState. and if I recall right, if you use that method the app doesn't look for the new layout according to the current new orientation and you should do it your self which is very difficult if even possible. –  Saeid Farivar Feb 16 '13 at 0:31
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe this is because of ViewPager/Adapter onSaveInstanceState methods. onCreateView tries to restore data prior to the asynctask dataload when data isn't available yet.

That is not what is happening(I'm assuming you get the exception at mDataObject.toString();), even if the AsyncTask would finish its job instantaneously the exception will still be thrown. After the first run of the app the ViewPager will have three fragments in it. When you'll turn the phone the Activity will be destroyed an recreated again. The ViewPager will try to recreate the fragments in it, but this time it will do it by using the default empty constructor(that is why you shouldn't use a non empty constructor to pass data). As you can see, the first time the Fragment is created by the adapter it will be created by the getInstance method(that is also the only point where you initialize mDataObject) to which you pass a TestDataObject object. When the ViewPager reinitializes its fragments that field will not be initialized as well.

If TestDataObject can be put in a Bundle then you could simply adapt your getInstance method to pass some arguments to your fragments(so the data field will be initialized when the ViewPager will recreate them). I'm sure you've seen:

public static TestFragment getInstance(TestDataObject obj) {
      TestFragment f = new TestFragment();
      // f.mDataObject = obj; <- don't do this
      // if possible
      Bundle args = new Bundle();
      args.put("data", obj); // only if obj can be put in a Bundle
      f.setArguments(args); 
      return f;
}

private TestDataObject mDataObject; 

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstance) {
     mDataObject = getArguments().get("data"); // again, depends on your TestDataObject 
}

Another approach would be to pass the smallest amount of data to the Fragment(like above) so it has enough information to recreate it's data whenever it's recreated.

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