Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't quite understand the example given from the 'man find', can anyone give me some examples and explanations? Can I combine regular expression in it?


the more detailed question is like this: write a shell script, changeall, which has an interface like "changeall [-r|-R] "string1" "string2". It will find all files with an suffix of .h, .C, .cc, or .cpp and change all occurrences of "string1" to "string2". -r is option for staying in current dir only or including subdir's. NOTE: 1) for non-recursive case, 'ls' is NOT allowed, we could only use 'find' and 'sed'. 2) I tried 'find -depth' but it was NOT supported. That's why I was wondering if '-prune' could help, but didn't understand the example from 'man find'.


EDIT2: I was doing assignment, I didn't ask question in great details because I would like to finish it myself. Since I already done it and hand it in, now I can state the whole question. Also, I managed to finish the assignment without using -prune, but would like to learn it anyway.

share|improve this question
    
The "belongs-on-superuser" tag is interesting. One could argue that this is a question about using find, but on the other hand one could just as easily argue that this is a question about shell script programming. –  Laurence Gonsalves Sep 28 '09 at 20:59
    
Can you give an example of what you'd like to accomplish? –  Dennis Williamson Sep 28 '09 at 23:04
4  
One could argue that it's quite stupid to argue about which of the 27,000 stackexchange sites this belongs on. It's a question a lot of computer programmers would encounter, so if it's not obviously misplaced, like in judaism.stackexchange.com, then I don't see the point of even discussing "moving" it. –  orange80 Jun 26 '11 at 16:09
4  
To my mind, this illustrates that it's stupid to have split the stackoverflow sites up in the first place. Lots of questions belong on several of the sites, and now the knowledge is fragmented and unfindable. –  Jonathan Hartley Dec 6 '11 at 18:14
1  
The obvious answer is: multi-homed (i.e. cross-site) questions! Clearly. –  Ben Mosher Aug 10 '12 at 19:55

8 Answers 8

up vote 191 down vote accepted

The thing I'd found confusing about about -prune is that it's an action (like -print), not a test (like -name). It alters the "to-do" list, but always returns true.

The general pattern for using -prune is this:

find [path] [conditions to prune] -prune -o \
                                   [your usual conditions] [actions to perform]

You pretty much always want the the -o immediately after -prune, because that first part of the test (up to including -prune) will return false for the stuff you actually want (ie: the stuff you don't want to prune out).

Here's an example:

find . -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo' -print

This will find the "*.foo" files that aren't under ".snapshot" directories. In this example, -name .snapshot is the "tests for stuff you want to prune", and -name '*.foo' -print is the "stuff you'd normally put after the path".

Important notes:

  1. If all you want to do is print the results you might be used to leaving out the -print action. You generally don't want to do that when using -prune.

    The default behavior of find is to "and" the entire expression with the -print action if there are no actions other than -prune (ironically) at the end. That means that writing this:

    find . -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo'              # DON'T DO THIS
    

    is equivalent to writing this:

    find . \( -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo' \) -print # DON'T DO THIS
    

    which means that it'll also print out the name of the directory you're pruning, which usually isn't what you want. Instead it's better to explicitly specify the -print action if that's what you want:

    find . -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo' -print       # DO THIS
    
  2. If your "usual condition" happens to match files that also match your prune condition, those files will not be included in the output. The way to fix this is to add a -type d predicate to your prune condition.

    For example, suppose we wanted to prune out any directory that started with .git (this is admittedly somewhat contrived -- normally you only need to remove thing named exactly .git), but other than that wanted to see all files, including files like .gitignore. You might try this:

    find . -name '.git*' -prune -o -type f -print               # DON'T DO THIS
    

    This would not include .gitignore in the output. Here's the fixed version:

    find . -type d -name '.git*' -prune -o -type f -print       # DO THIS
    

Extra tip: if you're using the GNU version of find, the texinfo page for find has a more detailed explanation than its manpage (as is true for most GNU utilities).

share|improve this answer
15  
thanks for actually showing how -prune behaves. It is most "unobvious" in the man pages –  jrharshath Jul 13 '11 at 15:34
    
Excellent example of how -prune works with find.I also had confusion about this, as its not clear from man page as well. Thanks Lawrence –  dig_123 Nov 1 '12 at 17:59
3  
it's not 100% obvious in your text (but as you only print '*.foo' it doesn't conflict) but the -prune part will also not print anything (not only directories) named ".snapshot". ie, -prune doesn't only work on directories (but, for directories, it also does prevent entering the directories matching that condition, ie here the dirs matching that -name .snapshot). –  Olivier Dulac Jan 16 '13 at 16:22
2  
and +1 for you for the nicely done explanation (and especially the important note). You should submit this to the find developpers (as the man page doesn't explain "prune" for normal human beings ^^ It took me many tries to figure it out, and I didn't see that side effect you warns us about) –  Olivier Dulac Jan 16 '13 at 16:25
    
@OlivierDulac That's a very good point about potentially stripping files you want to keep. I've updated the answer to clarify this. it isn't actually -prune itself that causes this, by the way. The issue is that the or operator "short-circuits", and or has lower precedence than and. The end result is that if a file called .snapshot is encountered it will match the first -name, -prune will then do nothing (but return true), and then the or returns true since its left-argument was true. The action (eg: -print) is part of its second argument, so it never has a chance to execute. –  Laurence Gonsalves Jan 19 '13 at 2:44

Beware that -prune does not prevent descending into any directory as some have said. It prevents descending into directories that match the test it's applied to. Perhaps some examples will help (see the bottom for a regex example). Sorry for this being so lengthy.

$ find . -printf "%y %p\n"    # print the file type the first time FYI
d .
f ./test
d ./dir1
d ./dir1/test
f ./dir1/test/file
f ./dir1/test/test
d ./dir1/scripts
f ./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
f ./dir1/scripts/myscript.sh
f ./dir1/scripts/myscript.py
d ./dir2
d ./dir2/test
f ./dir2/test/file
f ./dir2/test/myscript.pl
f ./dir2/test/myscript.sh

$ find . -name test
./test
./dir1/test
./dir1/test/test
./dir2/test

$ find . -prune
.

$ find . -name test -prune
./test
./dir1/test
./dir2/test

$ find . -name test -prune -o -print
.
./dir1
./dir1/scripts
./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
./dir1/scripts/myscript.sh
./dir1/scripts/myscript.py
./dir2

$ find . -regex ".*/my.*p.$"
./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
./dir1/scripts/myscript.py
./dir2/test/myscript.pl

$ find . -name test -prune -regex ".*/my.*p.$"
(no results)

$ find . -name test -prune -o -regex ".*/my.*p.$"
./test
./dir1/test
./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
./dir1/scripts/myscript.py
./dir2/test

$ find . -regex ".*/my.*p.$" -a -not -regex ".*test.*"
./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
./dir1/scripts/myscript.py

$ find . -not -regex ".*test.*"                   .
./dir1
./dir1/scripts
./dir1/scripts/myscript.pl
./dir1/scripts/myscript.sh
./dir1/scripts/myscript.py
./dir2
share|improve this answer
    
if you also "touch ./dir1/scripts/test" (ie, have a "test" file, and not dir, in that printed out subdir), it won't get printd by the find . -name test -prune -o -print : iow, -prune is an action that also works on files –  Olivier Dulac Jan 16 '13 at 16:27

Normally the native way we do things in linux and the way we think is from left to right.
So you would go and write what you are looking for first:

find / -name "*.php"

Then you probably hit enter and realize you are getting too many files from directories you wish not to. Let's exclude /media to avoid searching your mounted drives.
You should now just APPEND the following to the previous command:

-print -o -path '/media' -prune

so the final command is:

find / -name "*.php" -print -o -path '/media' -prune

...............|<--- Include --->|....................|<---------- Exclude --------->|

I think this structure is much easier and correlates to the right approach

share|improve this answer
    
I would not have expected this to be efficient - I would have thought that it would evaluate the left clause first before the prune, but to my surprise a quick test seems to suggest that find is clever enough to process the -prune clause first. Hmmm, interesting. –  artfulrobot Apr 29 at 11:08

Adding to the advice given in other answers (I have no rep to create replies)...

When combining -prune with other expressions, there is a subtle difference in behavior depending on which other expressions are used.

@Laurence Gonsalves' example will find the "*.foo" files that aren't under ".snapshot" directories:-

find . -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo' -print

However, this slightly different short-hand will, perhaps inadvertently, also list the .snapshot directory (and any nested .snapshot directories):-

find . -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo'

The reason is (according to the manpage on my system):-

If the given expression does not contain any of the primaries -exec, -ls, -ok, or -print, the given expression is effectively replaced by:

( given_expression ) -print

That is, the second example is the equivalent of entering the following, thereby modifying the grouping of terms:-

find . \( -name .snapshot -prune -o -name '*.foo' \) -print

This has at least been seen on Solaris 5.10. Having used various flavors of *nix for approx 10 years, I've only recently searched for a reason why this occurs.

share|improve this answer

Prune is a do not recurse at any directory switch.

From the man page

If -depth is not given, true; if the file is a directory, do not descend into it. If -depth is given, false; no effect.

Basically it will not desend into any sub directories.

Take this example:

You have the following directories

  • /home/test2
  • /home/test2/test2

If you run find -name test2:

It will return both directories

If you run find -name test2 -prune:

It will return only /home/test2 as it will not descend into /home/test2 to find /home/test2/test2

share|improve this answer
    
not 100% true: it is "do pruning when matching condition, and if it's a directory, take it out of the to-do list, ie don't enter it as well". -prune also works on files. –  Olivier Dulac Jan 16 '13 at 16:29

I am no expert at this (and this page was very helpful along with http://mywiki.wooledge.org/UsingFind)

Just noticed -path is for a path that fully matches the string/path that comes just after find (. in theses examples) where as -name matches all basenames.

find . -path ./.git  -prune -o -name file  -print

blocks the .git directory in your current directory ( as your finding in . )

find . -name .git  -prune -o -name file  -print

blocks all .git subdirectories recursively.

Note the ./ is extremely important!! -path must match a path anchored to . or whatever comes just after find if you get matches with out it (from the other side of the or '-o') there probably not being pruned! I was naively unaware of this and it put me of using -path when it is great when you don't want to prune all subdirectory with the same basename :D

share|improve this answer
    
Note if your doing say find bla/ then you would need -path bla/.git (or if you shoved a * at the front instead it would behave more like -name) –  sabgenton Dec 5 '13 at 9:11

If you read all the good answers here my understanding now is that the following all return the same results:

find . -path ./dir1\*  -prune -o -print

find . -path ./dir1  -prune -o -print

find . -path ./dir1\*  -o -print
#look no prune at all!

But the last one will take a lot longer as it still searches out everything in dir1. I guess the real question is how to -or out unwanted results without actually searching them.

So I guess prune means don't decent past matches but mark it as done...

http://www.gnu.org/software/findutils/manual/html_mono/find.html "This however is not due to the effect of the ‘-prune’ action (which only prevents further descent, it doesn't make sure we ignore that item). Instead, this effect is due to the use of ‘-o’. Since the left hand side of the “or” condition has succeeded for ./src/emacs, it is not necessary to evaluate the right-hand-side (‘-print’) at all for this particular file."

share|improve this answer

Show everything including dir itself but not its long boring contents:

find . -print -name dir -prune
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.