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In Vim, is there a way to rerun the latest :make command with the same set of arguments? Something like the recompile command in Emacs.

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Just type :ma then <Up>. –  romainl Feb 15 '13 at 10:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

type :make then press will put your last :make command in your command line. is this ok for you?

if you hate to type :make every time, you could bind/map your make command to some key, then you just press the key to execute your command.

P.S. anybody knows how to make "up-arrow" looks like a keyboard key with SO markdown? <kbd>??</kbd> C-V <up> doesn't work here for sure. :)

thank you Ingo Karkat!!

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That's the HTML &uarr; entity. –  Ingo Karkat Feb 15 '13 at 10:58
    
@IngoKarkat thank you! –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 11:11

When it's still the last executed Ex command, a simple @: will do. If you're unsure, the suggested :make followed by is better. You may also like my redocommand plugin, which allows a recall via :R :make (or any shorter uniquely identifying string).

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I have the following setting, a mapping, command and a function for this:

command! -nargs=* Make write | let g:make_args="<args>" | make <args> | cwindow 6
function! Make2()
  if !exists("g:make_args")
    let g:make_args = ""
  endif
  wall
  exec "silent! make " . g:make_args
  cwindow 6
  redraw
endfunction
inoremap <F2> <ESC>:call Make2()<CR><C-L>
noremap <F2> :call Make2()<CR><C-L>

you need to explicitly call :Make myprog once. After that you simply type <F2> and and it uses the last arguments you used for your last :Make command. If you want to make something else just use again :Make new_prog explicitly.

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