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SELECT 
  a.idmotcle,
  a.motcle, 
  count(DISTINCT c.id) as 'Programs',
  count(DISTINCT d.id) as 'Searches',
  FORMAT(count(DISTINCT d.id)/count(DISTINCT c.id),2) as 'S/P'

FROM motcle a
INNER JOIN motcle b 
     ON b.idmotcle=a.idmotcle AND a.archive=0
LEFT JOIN masters_keywords_nton c 
     ON c.id_motcle=a.idmotcle
LEFT JOIN master_search_log_tbl d 
     ON d.search_string LIKE concat('%',a.motcle,'%')
GROUP BY a.idmotcle
ORDER BY a.motcle

table - total records approx

motcle - 200

masters_keywrods_nton - 1300

master_search_log_tbl - 4800

I already have indexes on all the fields used in the ON clauses.

The query currently takes 62.887 seconds when I run it on production.

I feel there is some better way to do the joining and counting?

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what is the purpose of join table motcle a to motcle b? i do not see where b is used. –  Anda Iancu Feb 15 '13 at 12:24
    
@AndaIancu I'm using an inner join to filter the table on a.archive=0 –  Matt Feb 15 '13 at 13:38
    
No need for inner join - you can add where clause 'WHERE a.archive = 0'. –  Anda Iancu Feb 15 '13 at 13:47

1 Answer 1

If you want help with query optimization then please provide the EXPLAIN plan for the query and the CREATE table statements.

It's also important to know what the query does - you should provide an explanation for each phrase / expression in the query.

Like why are you joining motcle to itself on the same field? Why are you using left joins? Why are you counting null values as matches?

At a rough guess, I suspect this may give you what you need:

SELECT 
  a.idmotcle,
  a.motcle, 
  count(DISTINCT c.id) as 'Programs',
  count(DISTINCT d.id) as 'Searches',
  FORMAT(count(DISTINCT d.id)/count(DISTINCT c.id),2) as 'S/P'
FROM motcle a
INNER JOIN masters_keywords_nton c 
 ON c.id_motcle=a.idmotcle
INNER JOIN master_search_log_tbl d 
 ON d.search_string LIKE concat('%',a.motcle,'%')
WHERE a.archive=0
GROUP BY a.idmotcle
ORDER BY a.motcle

But the glaring WTF here is that your data is not mormalized (d.search_string LIKE concat('%',a.motcle,'%')) - fixing this will give you the biggest performance improvement and fix the potential functional bugs in the code. (using fulltext indexes might provide a temporary reprieve).

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