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I'm practicing on windows phone 8 samples. I've done finding the remaining battery percentage and remaining time by using the following codes,

using Windows.Phone.Devices.Power;


// Constructor
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _battery = Battery.GetDefault();
        _battery.RemainingChargePercentChanged += OnRemainingChargePercentChanged;
        UpdateUI();
    }

    private void UpdateUI()
    {
        txtContent1.Text = string.Format("{0} %", _battery.RemainingChargePercent);
        txtContent2.Text = string.Format("{0} hours", _battery.RemainingDischargeTime.TotalHours);
    }

    private void OnRemainingChargePercentChanged(object sender, object e)
    {
        UpdateUI();
    }

But I don't know how to find the battery usage of an app or remaining time of application usage for example,

I don't know how to find the battery usage of Wifi or remaining time for using the Wifi. or some other apps.

if somebody knows means please say!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no way you can do that on a physical device for many reasons.

Think of it - just because you are using WiFi, doesn't mean you will be only keeping the network on for background updates. You will most likely use it to download a music file, or a picture, or keep streaming online radio. Or you might as well launch a game.

The estimate that is given to you for the battery is based on the default metrics. It would be hard to restrict it to a very generic subset without exposing your app to many other indicators.

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Also, attribution is complicated. For example, suppose two apps are using WiFi, and suppose that WiFi costs x units per hour. Do you say that each app is consuming x/2 units per hour for WiFi? That would be misleading because shutting off one app will still keep WiFi active, so it is still costing x units per hour. The user says, "No fair. I closed program A that was using x/2 units per hour, and instead of reducing my battery usage, program B's WiFi battery usage jumped from x/2 to x! Program B sucks! I'm going to write a bad review." –  Raymond Chen Feb 17 '13 at 3:27
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