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I need to open an URL, from an anchor situated on a page created for Facebook at the top-most level. Doing some research, I found that the new X-Frame-Options restrictions are blocking this action and that a possible fix for this is to allow access at the requester level, ie. my application.

The application is being hosted through IIS 6 so I could easily add the required custom header X-Frame-Options ALLOW-FROM http://www.mywebsite.com/, however, I still get the refusal message when trying to click on a link in my page.

I cannot upgrade to a newer version of IIS as marketing material already went out. Is there another way to fix this, or am I adding the X-Frame-Options at the wrong location?

Also, I have target="_top" in both my anchors.

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I need to open an URL, from an anchor situated on a page created for Facebook at the top-most level. Doing some research, I found that the new X-Frame-Options restrictions are blocking this action

No, it's the other way around - what the X-Frame-Options header does, is restrict a document from being displayed in any kind of frame environment.

and that a possible fix for this is to allow access at the requester level, ie. my application.

No. The responder, that is, the web server delivering the resource, has to set that header to control where the document can be displayed or not.

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so, the responser (jadederic.com) has to set the header, which I'm doing? –  JadedEric Feb 15 '13 at 12:06
    
Then what's the actual problem? I still don't know what opening a page on top level has to do with this. –  CBroe Feb 15 '13 at 12:09
    
I have an application, located at somedomain.com/social which I iframe into Facebook, through FB Tabs. 3 pages in total, you get to the last page, and you have a button. You click this button to share something on twitter, that's the top level, because Twitter OAuth does not allow iframes, as we know. now facebook is blocking this because of XFO –  JadedEric Feb 15 '13 at 12:15
    
I still can't see why anything in that scenario should be blocked because of an X-FRAME-OPTIONS header. –  CBroe Feb 15 '13 at 12:29
    
That's what Chrome is telling me. If I remove the X-Frame-Options header from IIS that serves my pages, Facebook just blocks it out, but target="_top" is not working still, even with ALLOW-FROM somedomain.com enabled on the page.. –  JadedEric Feb 15 '13 at 12:37

From my experience, please consider the following scenario: Domain A: Your domain Domain B: Facebook

Your HTTP Response Header rule in IIS (assuming you're using IIS) would be: Name: X-Frame-Options Value: ALLOW-FROM http://www.facebook.com

This will allow facebook to host an iFrame with your content inside of it. The parent of the iFrame is facebook.com which is why you must use this approach. You would set the value to SAMEORIGIN if the host header you were supplying in the ALLOW-FROM value was the same as the hosting domain.

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