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I want to delete rows on a child table. I receive the error

The DELETE statement conflicted with the REFERENCE constraint "FK_Address_UserDataSet". The conflict occurred in database "XYZ", table "dbo.Address", column 'DataSetId'. The statement has been terminated.

I have a database structure with a parent UserDataSet and child Address table (where a parent can have any number of childs).

There is a foreign key constraint (mentioned in the error) that requires the child's DataSetId to relate to a valid UserDataSet.

Here are the table and constraint scripts, created with MS SQL Server Management Studio 2008 in simplified form:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Address](
    [AddressId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [DataSetId] [int] NOT NULL,
        --other fields
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Address] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [AddressId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

---

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[UserDataSet](
    [DataSetId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
        --other fields
 CONSTRAINT [PK_UserDataSet] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [DataSetId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
GO

---Create the constraint

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Address]  WITH NOCHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_Address_UserDataSet] FOREIGN KEY([DataSetId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[UserDataSet] ([DataSetId])
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Address] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_Address_UserDataSet]
GO

But, how can deleting a child (not the parent) be a problem in this setup?

Can it be that the row to delete is currently invalid, probably added while the constraint was not (yet) in use), an the constraint now is enforced while deleting the child with an invalid foreign key?

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1  
There should not be any child row without a valid parent. Still do a recheck at you end. –  Kangkan Feb 15 '13 at 12:33
1  
I suggest that you generate create scrips for both tables. Recreate the tables in a test database. Test by inserting some values into the parent and child in your test database. Try to delete them and see if you can figure it out. If you can't figure out what goes wrong please repost the create table scripts and your test insert / delete statements here. Posting create / insert / delete script would say more than a description of thousand words :) –  mortb Feb 15 '13 at 12:39
1  
You could also do a SQLFiddle.com that shows us your problem –  mortb Feb 15 '13 at 12:40
    
@mortb I have investigated the case with a unit test, and manually introduced a child with an invalid reference to the parent table. I was able to reproduce the error. –  Marcel Feb 15 '13 at 13:30
1  
@Marcel: Check (1) if you have a DELETE FROM [dbo].[UserDataSet]... statement (2) if you have an AFTER/INSTEAD OF trigger on [dbo].[Address] or [dbo].[UserDataSet]. –  Bogdan Sahlean Feb 16 '13 at 21:19
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1 Answer 1

Why are you adding the constraint with NOCHECK?

From MSDN documentation...

If you do not want to verify new CHECK or FOREIGN KEY constraints against existing data, use WITH NOCHECK. We do not recommend doing this, except in rare cases. The new constraint will be evaluated in all later data updates. Any constraint violations that are suppressed by WITH NOCHECK when the constraint is added may cause future updates to fail if they update rows with data that does not comply with the constraint.

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Good point, this is most probably the root of the problem. But what to do now, when I am not even able to delete? –  Marcel Feb 15 '13 at 14:27
1  
You need to ensure referential integrity before applying the foreign key constraint. What DELETE statement are you using? I would have thought you could delete child records which have an invalid parent.... –  El Ronnoco Feb 15 '13 at 22:11
    
The delete statement comes via Linq to SQL, so I can not tell exactly right now. But I have thought that deleting children is no problem, too - that's what this question is all about... –  Marcel Feb 16 '13 at 21:36
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