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I have this:

>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]
>>> print a.insert(2, 3)
None
>>> print a
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> b = a.insert(3, 6)
>>> print b
None
>>> print a
[1, 2, 3, 6, 4]
>>> 

Is there anyway I can get the updated list as result, instead of updating the original list in place?

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2  
b = a[:].insert(2,3) seems pretty short, doesn't affect the original list and is pretty descriptive. –  mkoistinen Jun 26 '14 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

l.insert(index, obj) doesn't actually return anything, it just updates the list. As ATO said, you can do b = a[:index] + [obj] + a[index:]. However, another way is:

a = [1, 2, 4]
a.insert(2, 3)
b = a[:]
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I want to reduce the number of lines... –  ATOzTOA Feb 16 '13 at 0:54
3  
If you can't tolerate 3 lines of readable code, put it in a function and call it. –  IceArdor Aug 1 '14 at 21:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Shortest I got: b = a[:2] + [3] + a[2:]

>>> 
>>> a = [1, 2, 4]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]
>>> b = a[:2] + [3] + a[2:]
>>> print a
[1, 2, 4]
>>> print b
[1, 2, 3, 4]
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