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Please forgive me a beginner's question :)

string S="abc";
S+="\";

won't complile.

string S="abc";
S+="\\";

will make S="abc\\"

How can I make S="abc\" ?

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use \u005c instead of \ and check it.. –  Rahil2952 Feb 15 '13 at 13:20
2  
Your second example is correct. You may see S="abc\\" in a watch window, but that's just the IDE being clever and escaping the character in the string (similarly if you had a newline char in the string, the watch window would show "foo\nbar") –  Ross McNab Feb 15 '13 at 13:27
1  
@RossMcNab, you should make that an answer. –  Mizipzor Feb 15 '13 at 13:28

8 Answers 8

Your second piece of code is what you want (or a verbatim string literal @"\" as others have suggested), and it only adds a single backslash - print it to the console and you'll see that.

These two pieces of code:

S += "\\";

and

S += @"\";

are exactly equivalent. In both cases, a single backslash is appended1.

I suspect you're getting confused by the debugger view, which escapes backslashes (and some other characters). You can validate that even with the debugger by looking at S.Length, which you'll see is 4 rather than 5.


1 Note that it doesn't change the data in the existing string, but it sets the value of S to refer to a new string which consists of the original with a backslash on the end. String objects in .NET are immutable - but that's a whole other topic...

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Try this:

String S = "abc";
S += @"\";

@ = verbatim string literal

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691090%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/362314fe.aspx

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1  
This is exactly equivalent code to the OP's second snippet, and doesn't explain what's going on at all. –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 13:34
1  
Agreed - The OP is concerned that they are unable to escape the backslash character. Their second example is correct, but the visual studio debugger shows the slash is still present in the string (when it isn't). –  RainbowFish Feb 15 '13 at 15:06
string S = "abs" + "\\";  

Should and does result in abc\.

What you are probably seeing is the way the debugger/intellisense visualizes the string for you. Try printing your string to the console or display it in a textbox.

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You already have the solution. The reason it appears as abc\\ whilst debugging is because VS will escape backslashes, print the value of S to a console window and you'll see abc\. You could add an @ to the start of the string literal, e.g.

string S="abc";
S+= @"\";

Which will achieve the same thing.

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This will have exactly the same effect as S+="\\"; - just giving an alternative way of achieving the same result doesn't really help the OP, in my view. –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 13:21
    
Edited with a little more explanation. –  DGibbs Feb 15 '13 at 13:31

Your second example is perfectly fine

string S="abc";
S+="\\";

Visual studio displays string escaped, that's why you see two slashes in result string. If you don't want to use escaping declare string like this

@"\"

This is not compiling because compiler is expecting a character after escape symbol

string S="abc";
S+="\";
share|improve this answer

You can escape the backslash with the @ character:

string S="abc";
S += @"\";

But this accomplishes exactly what you've written in your second example. The confusion on this is stemming from the fact that the Visual Studio debugger continues to escape these characters, even though your source string will contain only a single backslash.

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This just gives an alternative way of achieving the same result as the OP's second piece of code... which would still cause confusion, without explanation of what the OP is seeing in the debugger. –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 14:54
string S="abc";
S+="\\";
Console.WriteLine(S); // This is what you're missing ;)

You'll see your string is not wrong at all.

The backslash (\) is an escape character, and allows you to get special characters that you wouldn't normally be able to insert in a string, such as "\r\n", which represents a NewLine character, or "\"" which basically gives you a " character.

In order to get the \ character, you need to input "\\" which is exactly what you're doing and also what you want.

Using the verbatim (@) replaces all occurrences of \ into \\, so @"\" == "\\". This is usually used for paths and regexes, where literal \ are needed in great numbers. Saying @"C:\MyDirectory\MyFile" is more comfortable than "C:\\MyDirectory\\MyFile" after all.

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Try this

 string s="abc";
 s = s+"\\";
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Won't compile.. –  DGibbs Feb 15 '13 at 13:25
    
I have tried in my example and its working. –  Utkarsh Feb 15 '13 at 13:27
2  
@Utkarsh: I bet you haven't. You haven't declared a variable s. –  Jon Skeet Feb 15 '13 at 14:53
    
@JonSkeet in you answer u hvnt declare S then your code also wrong. –  Utkarsh Feb 16 '13 at 5:00
1  
@Utkarsh: The original code already contained S - I was clearly providing an alternative second line. Your code redeclared S, but didn't do anything with s. Your answer also doesn't actually help the OP at all, as it will have exactly the same result as the original second piece of code, which was already appending the backslash correctly. –  Jon Skeet Feb 16 '13 at 7:55

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