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I would like to use the Enumerable.Aggregate(...) method to concatenate a list of strings separated by a semicolon. Rather easy, isn't it?

Considering the following:

  • private const string LISTSEPARATOR = "; ";
  • album.OrderedTracks is List<TrackDetails>
  • TrackDetails has DiscNumber Int16? property

The following statement will trow an exception if the sequence returned by Distinct() is empty (as the Aggregate() method doesn't apply on empty sequence):

    txtDiscNumber.Text = album.OrderedTracks
        .Where(a => a.DiscNumber.HasValue)
        .Select(a => a.DiscNumber.Value.ToString())
        .Distinct()
        .Aggregate((i, j) => i + LISTSEPARATOR + j);

The workaround I am using:

    List<string> DiscNumbers = 
        album.OrderedTracks
            .Where(a => a.DiscNumber.HasValue)
            .Select(a => a.DiscNumber.Value.ToString())
            .Distinct()
            .ToList();

    if (!DiscNumbers.Any())
        txtDiscNumber.Text = null;
    else
        txtDiscNumber.Text = 
            DiscNumbers.Aggregate((i, j) => i + LISTSEPARATOR + j);

Is there any better solution? Is it possible to do this in a single LINQ statement?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Aggregate, in general, is not a good idea for dealing with aggregating strings, because concating strings is not a cheap operation, and it scales very poorly. If you're going to do this yourself you should be using something like a StringBuilder, although in your specific case you can use String.Join, which will internally avoid excessive string concatenation, so not only does it handle this edge case better, but it will perform much better for non-trivial data sets. –  Servy Feb 15 '13 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

To concatenate the string, use the string.Join method.

Aggregate function doesn't work with empty collections. It requires a binary accumulate function and it needs an item in the collection to pass to the binary function as a seed value.

However, there is an overload of Aggregate:

public static TResult Aggregate<TSource, TAccumulate, TResult>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
    TAccumulate seed,
    Func<TAccumulate, TSource, TAccumulate> func,
    Func<TAccumulate, TResult> resultSelector
)

This overload allows you to specify the seed value. You can use string.Empty for your purpose.

share|improve this answer

Use String.Join like this:

 txtDiscNumber.Text = String.Join(LISTSEPARATOR,
      album.OrderedTracks
                  .Where(a => a.DiscNumber.HasValue)
                  .Select(a => a.DiscNumber.Value.ToString())
                  .Distinct());
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. –  lorcan Feb 15 '13 at 15:19

I think you might find the following helper extension method useful.

public static TOut Pipe<TIn, TOut>(this TIn _this, Func<TIn, TOut> func)
{
    return func(_this);
}

It allows you to express your query in the following way.

txtDiscNumber.Text = album.OrderedTracks
    .Where(a => a.DiscNumber.HasValue)
    .Select(a => a.DiscNumber.Value.ToString())
    .Distinct()
    .Pipe(items => string.Join(LISTSEPARATOR, items));

This still reads "top to bottom," which greatly aids readability.

share|improve this answer

Used methods like that a lot for debugging purposes, came up with two extension-methods:

public static string Concatenate<T, U>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, U> selector, string separator = ", ")
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    return source
        .Select(selector)
        .Concatenate(separator);
}

public static string Concatenate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, string separator = ", ")
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    bool firstPass = true;
    foreach (string item in source.Distinct().Select(x => x.ToString()))
    {
        if (firstPass)
        {
            firstPass = false;
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(separator);
        }

        sb.Append(item);
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}

Use like this:

string myLine = myCol.Concatenate(x => x.TheProperty);
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