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I'm sure there's a good simple elegant one-liner in Ruby to give you the number of days in a given month, accounting for year, such as "February 1997". What is it?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is the implementation from ActiveSupport (a little adapted):

COMMON_YEAR_DAYS_IN_MONTH = [nil, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31]

def days_in_month(month, year = Time.now.year)
   return 29 if month == 2 && Date.gregorian_leap?(year)
   COMMON_YEAR_DAYS_IN_MONTH[month]
end
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Btw, originally implemented in module Time. –  andre-r Sep 29 '09 at 0:13
    
super dated at this point. look at some of the other answers. –  drewish May 20 at 17:55

If you're working in Rails, chances are you'll get hamstrung eventually if you switch among Time, Date, and DateTime, especially when it comes to dealing with UTC/time zones, daylight savings, and the like. My experience has been it's best to use Time, and stick with it everywhere.

So, assuming you're using Rails's Time class, there are two good options, depending on context:

  1. If you have a month m and year y, use the class method on Time:

    days = Time.days_in_month(m, y)
    
  2. If you have a Time object t, cleaner to ask the day number of the last day of the month:

    days = t.end_of_month.day
    
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2  
This should be the accepted answer really –  dolzenko Aug 3 '12 at 13:08
1  
Thanks! but not really -- OP asked about ruby, not rails. I'd be interested to know how many folks are working in Ruby Off Rails, though. –  mkosma Oct 17 '12 at 22:19
1  
This answer really feels like the 'right' way to do it! –  tdubs Jul 6 '13 at 13:48
3  
I use ruby outside rails and this answer would be no good for me. –  SteveRawlinson Sep 6 '13 at 14:37
    
@SteveRawlingson Get your career on track then! :P –  Starkers Feb 22 at 20:44

How about:

require 'date'

def days_in_month(year, month)
  (Date.new(year, 12, 31) << (12-month)).day
end

# print number of days in Feburary 2009
puts days_in_month(2009, 2)

You may also want to look at Time::days_in_month in Ruby on Rails.

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Could you explain what make this def? Because I like but I want to understand –  Bruce_Warrior Oct 15 '12 at 1:25
1  
@Mike Wade, this assumes we know December has 31 days. What about if we don't even know that? –  nemesisfixx Nov 2 '12 at 7:08
1  
December will always have 31 days. –  Alex Neth Nov 8 '12 at 20:38
1  
@nemesisfixx, you can work off Jan 1 instead of Dec 31. ((Date.new(year+1, 1, 1) - 1.day) << (12-month)).day –  Isaac Betesh Apr 5 '13 at 18:55
    
@IsaacBetesh, yep get it ((Date.new(2013+1, 1, 1) - day_offset) << (12-month)).day works for me :-) –  nemesisfixx Apr 8 '13 at 6:24

I'm new to Ruby so don't know whether this feature was available when Mike Wade answered. (Would have commented on his answer but don't think I have enough rep to do that.)

require 'date'

def days_in_month(year, month)
  Date.new(year, month, -1).day
end

# print number of days in Feburary 2012
puts days_in_month(2012, 2)
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3  
This should be the accepted answer. –  steenslag Feb 12 '13 at 16:03
    
+1 Much cleaner and easier to read in the future –  Michael Durrant Oct 18 '13 at 13:23
    
btw I didn't need to require Date in my ruby only program. –  Michael Durrant Oct 18 '13 at 13:23

revise the input for other format

def days_in_a_month(date = "2012-02-01")
  date.to_date.end_of_month.day
end
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Use Time.days_in_month(month) where month = 1 for January, 2 for Feb, etc.

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as of rails 3.2... there's a built in version: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/Time.html#method-c-days_in_month

(alas, it shows up after this answer, which takes folks on a long hike)

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I think it's the simplest way to get it

def get_number_of_days(date = Date.today)
  Date.new(date.year, date.month, -1).mday
end
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