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how can I implement the following in VIM

substitute/regex_this_word/regex_with_another_word_from_the_same_line

e.g

select "ali" as name where _placeholder = _placeholder
union
select "sam" as name where _placeholder = _placeholder

after applying

:%s/_placeholder/anythin_between_quotation/

becomes

select "ali" as name where ali = ali
union
select "sam" as name where sam = sam

e.g2

select id, "_placeholder" as vul members_repeater/vul/none

after applying

:%s/_placehold/\=something_like_regexp(getline('.'),'regexp_pattern_to_select_everthing_after_/vul/")

becomes

select id, "none" as vul members_repeater/vul/none 

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
is there only one quotation part in each line? –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 15:59
    
well, I just put it as an example, ultimately it's a regexp, right? –  Ali Feb 15 '13 at 16:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
:%s/_placeholder/\=split(getline("."),'"')[1]/g

this works in this case:

  • only one quotation part (replacement) in each line
  • the quotation part could be anywhere in this line

for example:

select "ali" as name where _placeholder = _placeholder
union
select "sam" as name where _placeholder = _placeholder
select _placeholder where _placeholder = _placeholder "foo"
select _placeholder where "bar", _placeholder = _placeholder

into

select "ali" as name where ali = ali
union
select "sam" as name where sam = sam
select foo where foo = foo "foo"
select bar where "bar", bar = bar

edit

\=split(getline("."),'"')[1]
 |  |      |
 |  |      +--- get current line text
 |  |
 |  +------ split the line with " as separator, pick the middle part ([1])
 |
 |
 +---- using expression replacement

new edit

so you can re-use the old routine :

:%s#_placeholder#\=split(split(getline("."),"vul/")[1]," ")[0]#g

this needs only one vul/ in your line, but there could be text after the keyword (with space as separator) something like:

select id, "_placeholder" as vul members_repeater/vul/none trashtrash

into

select id, "none" as vul members_repeater/vul/none trashtrash

see this example :

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
@Ali see edit pls –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 16:19
1  
@Ali, if more than one that part, you have to define the rule: which one is the replacement –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 16:19
1  
@Ali can you update your question, and add some more examples? the new requirement has no big difference from the old, or I misunderstood? –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 16:43
1  
@Ali see new edit –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 17:05
1  
@Ali don't know how is done there, but here with your example, worked. see newly updated, I added a gif. –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 17:17

For these lines in particular, that would be

s/^\(.*\)"\([^"]*\)"\(.*\)_placeholder\ = _placeholder/\1"\2"\3\2 = \2/

Explanations: expressions in between matching pairs of \( and \) are captures in \1, \2, etc. Hence, one way to proceed here is to capture everything up to _placeholder, and there put it back. A little unreadable, admittedly.

That solution assumes there is only one expression in double quotes on each line.

share|improve this answer
    
mmmm, can you breakdown to different lines and explain each line, it's very hard for me to read it and understand it, thanks –  Ali Feb 15 '13 at 16:09
    
it didn't work :( 'E486: Pattern not found: ^(.*)"([^"]*)"(.*)_placeholder\ = _placeholder' –  Ali Feb 15 '13 at 16:11
1  
You didn’t copy the backslashes. Anyway, glad Kent’s solution worked for you. –  Arthur Reutenauer Feb 15 '13 at 17:51

You can easily use sed if know it, it allow you to use extended regex:

example_with_no_link.txt:

from django.utils import unittest
from django.core import management
from app import subapp

vim command :

:%! sed -re "/django/ s/from (.*) import (.*)/from \2 import \1/"

This command does followings things :
1. :%!: Put all line in stdout
2. sed -re "/django/ : if there's 'django' in line
3. s/from (.*) import (.*)/from \2 import \1/ : reverse patterns in parenthesis

In sed, you catch your searched words with parenthesis and write them with \n.
The output is redirect to vim.

share|improve this answer
    
explanation please :) –  Ali Feb 15 '13 at 16:59
    
vim got ed's commands, but they are improved with sed. –  Zulu Feb 15 '13 at 17:08
1  
@Zulu I didn't see the advantage of using sed in your example. the extended regex of sed -r is not the selling point, the vim regex is much more powerful than extended regex. vim :s supports \1,\2 as well. but if an external cmd could solve the problem easily and fast, it is a way to go. –  Kent Feb 15 '13 at 17:30

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