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Say I have a JSON object like this:

var a = {
  "b" : {
    "c" : 1
  }
}

is there a quick way to get at c when I know the string "b.c" ?

I guess I could split the string by dots then drill down into c from that but I was hoping there was a quick way to do this in one go.

like I was hoping maybe var c = a["b.c"] but that doesnt work

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marked as duplicate by Denys Séguret, Paul D. Waite, BenSwayne, Patricia, Julius Feb 15 '13 at 18:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
My god... it's asked every day... –  Denys Séguret Feb 15 '13 at 16:06
    
Javascript object != JSON. Which one do you have? –  Jan Dvorak Feb 15 '13 at 16:06
    
@dystroy This question is not about parsing JSON. –  Jan Dvorak Feb 15 '13 at 16:07
1  
For example it links to this question : stackoverflow.com/questions/10934664/… –  Denys Séguret Feb 15 '13 at 16:11
1  
@dystroy: this question is not a duplicate of #14396647. It may require an answer that mentions eval, but it's absolutely not the same question. –  Paul D. Waite Feb 15 '13 at 16:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about something like this, as you suggested using a split:

var a = {
  "b" : {
    "c" : 1
  }
}

var n = "b.c".split(".");
var x = a;
for(var i = 0; i < n.length; i++){
   x = x[n[i]];
}
//x should now equal a.b.c

Here is a working example


In the event that the path is not valid, there is some extra checking that should be done. As my code stands above, x will be undefined if the final part of the path is invalid (e.g "b.d"). If any other part of the path is invalid (e.g. "d.c") then the javascript will error.

Here is a modified example that will end the loop at the first instance of undefined, this will leave x as undefined and will ensure the javascript can continue to execute (no error!)...

var n = "d.c".split(".");
var x = a;
for (var i = 0; i < n.length; i++) {
    x = x[n[i]];
    if (typeof(x) == "undefined") {
        break;
    }
}

Here is an example of this in action

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+1; doesn't require ES5 –  Jan Dvorak Feb 15 '13 at 16:16
1  
Note that it would be nice if you returned undefined if any part of the key is missing –  Jan Dvorak Feb 15 '13 at 16:17
    
@JanDvorak: It actually does return undefined, try changing "b.c" to "b.d". Although I appreciate it does not break the loop early at the first undefined that it finds. Ill have a play and edit ;-) –  musefan Feb 15 '13 at 16:19
    
@JanDvorak: Not with my edit it doesn't. Keep up! –  musefan Feb 15 '13 at 16:26
    
Nice change. However, what about a={zero:0}; n="zero.toString"? :-) It should return a function, but doesn't –  Jan Dvorak Feb 15 '13 at 16:28
var a = {
  "b" : {
    "c" : 1
  }
}

var c = "b.c".split(".").reduce(function(obj, key) {
    return obj[key];
}, a);

alert(c)

See reduce. The link also show a how to implement shim for the browsers that doesn't support ES5. Notice that this code is simplified, assumes the keys are present in the objects.

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