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I'm using the editablegrid library to make a table editable so I can later edit and update the database I'm pulling data from. I'm having some issues with the metadata header in the jsp. I've got:

<script src="js/editablegrid-2.0.1.js"></script>
<script>
    window.onload = function() {
        editableGrid = new EditableGrid("grid");

        // we build and load the metadata in Javascript
        editableGrid.load({
            metadata : [ {
                name : "ID",
                datatype : "string",
                editable : false
            }, {
                name : "DATE",
                datatype : "date",
                editable : false
            }, {
                name : "PRICE",
                datatype : "double (m, 10)",
                editable : true
            } ]
        });

        editableGrid.attachToHTMLTable('Grid');
        editableGrid.renderGrid();
    };
</script>

This all works quite nicely, however the PRICE column that is displayed is kinda weird, it uses a comma instead of a fullstop and vice versa. So for example:

1.5 (one and a half) will be displayed as "1,5" 1,500 (one thousand five hundred) will be displayed as "1.500"

Does anyone know how to change this?

Thanks in advance!

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What are the regional settings on the server running this code? –  Boris Pavlović Feb 15 '13 at 16:13
    
IT's set on UK :) –  Twinhelix Feb 15 '13 at 17:49
    
I checked the regional settings, decimal point is . and digit grouping symbol is , so it all seems okay –  Twinhelix Feb 15 '13 at 17:50
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1 Answer

The following worked for me.

{ name: "Price", datatype: "double($,2,dot,comma,1)", editable: true },

You can find out the format of the datatype parameter by reading the source.

In this case I have specified "$" because I want a dollar sign before the number. "2" because I want two decimal places. "dot" because I want a dot as the decimal separator, "comma" for the thousands separator, and 1 because I want the dollar sign to come before the number rather than after.

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