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I am under Ubuntu 12.10, and I have installed this git-prompt-aware: https://github.com/jimeh/git-aware-prompt

Whenever I am in a directory which has a git repository, I need to do source ~/.bash_profile to show the branch. If I don't do that, it doesn't show up. However, when I close the terminal and I go to the same directory, I need to do again the ~/.bash_profile , any thoughts why can this be happening?

My problem is that in the .bashrc I already have defined PS1 as:

case "$TERM" in
    xterm-color) color_prompt=yes;;
esac

# uncomment for a colored prompt, if the terminal has the capability; turned
# off by default to not distract the user: the focus in a terminal window
# should be on the output of commands, not on the prompt
force_color_prompt=yes

if [ -n "$force_color_prompt" ]; then
    if [ -x /usr/bin/tput ] && tput setaf 1 >&/dev/null; then
    # We have color support; assume it's compliant with Ecma-48
    # (ISO/IEC-6429). (Lack of such support is extremely rare, and such
    # a case would tend to support setf rather than setaf.)
    color_prompt=yes
    else
    color_prompt=
    fi
fi

if [ "$color_prompt" = yes ]; then
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\[\033[01;32m\]\u@\h\[\033[00m\]:\[\033[01;34m\]\w\[\033[00m\]\$ '
else
    PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
fi
unset color_prompt force_color_prompt

# If this is an xterm set the title to user@host:dir
case "$TERM" in
xterm*|rxvt*)
    PS1="\[\e]0;${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h: \w\a\]$PS1"
    ;;
*)
    ;;
esac

Which overwrites what I have in .bash_profile:

export GITAWAREPROMPT=~/.bash/git-aware-prompt
source $GITAWAREPROMPT/main.sh
export PS1="\u@\h \w\[$txtcyn\]\$git_branch\[$txtylw\]\$git_dirty\[$txtrst\]\$ "

How can I combine both of these PS1 settings?

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1 Answer 1

Put the content of ~/.bash_profile in ~/.bashrc. Every time you start the terminal, the content of ~/.bashrc is read.

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