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I have the following source:

    private T GetValue<T>(object value)
    {
        return (T)value;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Int64 integer = GetValue<Int64>(0);
    }

So the constant 0 is an Int32 and has to be cast to an Int64 in the generic method GetValue. But this will result in an InvalidCastException.

But why?

When I do it with an Int64 as parameter it works fine.

    private T GetValue<T>(object value)
    {
        return (T)value;
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Int64 zero = 0;
        Int64 integer = GetValue<Int64>(zero);
    }

Thanks to Jon and Brian. My final (simplified) solution is like this.

    private T GetValue<T>(object value)
    {
        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(defaultValue, typeof(T));
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Int64 integer = GetValue<Int64>(0);
    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

But why?

Because you're unboxing from a boxed int to long. It fails in exactly the same way that this fails with no generics:

int original = 0;
object boxed = original;
long unboxed = (long) boxed; // Bang!

Unboxing conversions have to be done to the same type (modulo enums and signed/unsigned).

share|improve this answer
    
Please mark this as the answer; because it is. –  Brian Feb 15 '13 at 16:36
    
Thank you very much. now i use dynamic instead of object and it works. –  Chris Feb 15 '13 at 17:56
    
@Chris: No, do not use dynamic to solve this problem. In Jon's example you could use long unboxed = (long) (int) boxed; // Success! Eric Lippert's excellent explanation: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/19/… –  Brian Feb 15 '13 at 19:41

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