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Im writing a markup for :
enter image description here

Would it be correct to present every tweet like an article or its too short and I should use ul or something else?

<section>
    <h1>Recent tweets</h1>
    <article>
        <p>I'm looking...</p>
        <time>3 day ago</time>
    </article>
    <article>
        <p>@mediatemple will ...</p>
        <time>6 days ago</time>
    </article>
    <article>
        <p>Corpora Business</p>
        <time>10 days ago</time>
    </article>
</section>  
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3  
If you believe that a tweet can be accurately described as an 'article', then use article (my own thought is that it can't, and is perhaps a synopsis or some form of comment on a longer-form article). Otherwise use a different element such as, as you mention, an li within a ul or ol. But it really doesn't matter, I don't think there's a minimum-length requirement for an article, and if there were I suspect it would be 'wrong' in many, many cases. –  David Thomas Feb 15 '13 at 16:50
    
ok, thank you for your comment-answer) –  SakerONE Feb 15 '13 at 17:00
    
Perhaps of interest, recent discussion about article on Public HTML –  steveax Feb 16 '13 at 17:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It really doesn't matter. The WHATWG is still pretty vague about it. My issue is with the h1. Is this the only thing on the page? Is the page title also 'Recent Tweets'? If so you're fine. But I get the sense this is like a plug-in on a larger page. If so, consider using a lower level tag, for semantic/accessibility reasons.

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it's in a footer) Ok, thank you) –  SakerONE Feb 15 '13 at 16:59
2  
Yes, for accessibility reasons it might be better to use the calculated heading level (but it's not that clear, as e.g. a certain JAWS version only works with the "h1 everywhere" approach). However, semantically it is correct to use h1 here, too. Both ways are possible. It depends on your users which way to go. Using h1 for all sectioning elements has the benefit that you can move the sections freely without having to adjust the heading level. –  unor Feb 16 '13 at 16:00

Yes, each microblogging entry should be an article, as it matches the definition:

The article element represents a self-contained composition in a document, page, application, or site and that is, in principle, independently distributable or reusable, e.g. in syndication. This could be a forum post, a magazine or newspaper article, a blog entry, a user-submitted comment, an interactive widget or gadget, or any other independent item of content.

You could list them in a ul/ (or, depending on the context, ol) too, if needed/appropriate:

<section>
  <h1>Recent tweets</h1>
  <ul>
    <li><article>…</article></li>
    <li><article>…</article></li>
    <li><article>…</article></li>
  </ul>
</section>

If you'd want to include metadata (like the author name), the footer element should be used. That's where your time element should be placed, too. If the author name would be linked to a profile where contacting the author is possible, the address element should be used (as it is associated with the article and not the whole page, which is another reason to use the article element for micro-blogging entries).

<article>
  <p>…</p>
  <footer>
    <time>…</time>
  </footer>
</article>
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This a ridiculous answer -1 –  CharlieTuna Oct 4 '13 at 20:14
    
@CharlieTuna: And why do you think that? I can’t clear up doubts if you don’t provide arguments. –  unor Oct 5 '13 at 14:45

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