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Hi I have this following code, it take nodes from slaveQueue and preload to preload1 and preload2, But the memory is always increasing. I assume it should be released after I call dfs since all the memory should be freed after the local function returns and I checked that pop() function will also free the memory ? so I wonder where is my memory leak? THanks

    queue<Graphnode> *preload1 = new queue<Graphnode>;
    queue<Graphnode> *preload2 = new queue<Graphnode>;
    for(int n = windowWidth; n > 0; n--)
    {
        if((*slaveQueue).empty())
        {
            //cout <<"fffffffffffff"<<endl;
            break;
        }
        (*preload2).push((*slaveQueue).front());
        //cout << (*slaveQueue).size()<<endl;
        (*slaveQueue).pop();
    }
    int preload1No =0;

    while(!(*preload2).empty())
    {
        preload1No++;
        *slaveroot = (*preload2).front();
        (*preload2).pop();
        if(!(*slaveQueue).empty())
        {
            (*preload2).push((*slaveQueue).front());
            (*slaveQueue).pop();
        }
        dfs(*slaveroot,goal,totalDepth,*preload1,*preload2,checkfile);
        if(preload1No>windowWidth)
        {
            (*preload1).push(*slaveroot);
            (*preload1).pop();
        }
        else
        {
            (*preload1).push(*slaveroot);
        }
        cout<<(*preload1).size()<<"\t"<<(*preload2).size()<<endl;
    }
    delete slaveroot;
    delete preload1;
    delete preload2;
    delete slaveQueue;
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1  
for each new you need a delete and for each delete you need a new. Your code looks fine because your not pass a copy of a your pass a pointer to a. –  andre Feb 15 '13 at 17:55
    
Better still - read about RAII, avoid new when you can –  Steve Townsend Feb 15 '13 at 18:09
    
Did you perhaps learn Java or C# first? –  Mooing Duck Feb 15 '13 at 18:39
    
I learnt C first.... –  weeo Feb 15 '13 at 21:43

6 Answers 6

Yes, it will make a copy of the pointer a, but not of the memory that a points to. So there is no memory leak here, and thus nothing to free.

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Since I wrote this answer, the text in the question has been COMPLETELY changed, and this answer makes very little sense to the code in the question). –  Mats Petersson Feb 15 '13 at 18:59

The a in func1 is pass by value, which means its on the stack. Hence it won't create any memory leak. It is released when func exits.

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so if there is any memory leak, I should not think about the variables in any function? –  weeo Feb 15 '13 at 17:50
    
You must use a profiler, and use tools like valgrind to hunt for memory leak. Remember to delete every new data and you'll almost always be safe. Also use STL to help you manage the complexity of your application. –  Aniket Feb 15 '13 at 17:52

If you are not explicitly allocating any memory in func1, and call no function that does that, then there is no memory leak. All you are copying into the function is a pointer. The copied pointer itself is on the function's stack, and gets popped along with everything else in the function's scope once the function returns.

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Your code as shown has no memory leaks.

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How often can you say that!? –  ipmcc Feb 15 '13 at 17:49

It does create a copy of a on the stack. But that memory is recovered as soon as the function returns.

If you have a memory leak, that is likely caused by code not shown here.

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When you pass a to your function, a copy of a itself is what gets passed. When the function exits, that copy of a gets destroyed. The memory that a points at isn't copied at all in your code.

Your code leaks one byte of memory1 because you're calling func1 in an infinite loop, so the delete a; will never execute. When most people talk/think about memory leaks, however, they're thinking of "progressive" leaks -- ones that leak more memory the longer the program runs.


  1. If you want to get technical, what it leaks is one minimum-sized block from your memory manager. That'll typically be larger than 1 byte, but exactly how much larger will depend on the implementation.
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