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I wrote an extremely naive implementation of the Sieve of Atkin, based on Wikipedia's inefficient but clear pseudocode. I initially wrote the algorithm in MATLAB, and it omits 5 as a prime number. I also wrote the algorithm in Python with the same result.

Technically, I know why 5 is being excluded; in the step where n = 4*x^2 + y^2, n == 5 when x == 1 and y == 1. This only occurs once, so 5 is flipped from prime to nonprime and never flipped back.

Why doesn't my algorithm match the one on Wikipedia? Although I have made a few superficial adjustments (e.g. only calculating x^2 once in each iteration, storing the value of mod(n, 12) when using it in the first equation, etc.) they shouldn't change the logic of the algorithm.

I read over several discussions related to the Sieve of Atkin, but I can't tell what differences are creating problems in my implementations.

Python code:

def atkin1(limit):
    res = [0] * (limit + 1)
    res[2] = 1
    res[3] = 1
    res[5] = 1

    limitSqrt = int(math.sqrt(limit))
    for x in range(1, limitSqrt+1):
        for y in range(1, limitSqrt+1):
            x2 = x**2
            y2 = y**2
            n = 4*x2 + y2
            if n == 5:
                print('debug1')
            nMod12 = n % 12
            if n <= limit and (nMod12 == 1 or nMod12 == 5):
                res[n] ^= 1

            n = 3*x2 + y2
            if n == 5:
                print('debug2')
            if n <= limit and (n % 12 == 7):
                res[n] ^= 1

            if x > y:
                n = 3*x2 - y2
                if n == 5:
                    print('debug3')
                if n <= limit and (n % 12 == 11):
                    res[n] ^= 1

    ndx = 5
    while ndx <= limitSqrt:
        m = 1
        if res[ndx]:
            ndx2 = ndx**2
            ndx2Mult =m * ndx2
            while ndx2Mult < limit:
                res[ndx2Mult] = 0
                m += 1
                ndx2Mult = m * ndx2
        ndx += 1

    return res

MATLAB code

function p = atkin1(limit)

% 1. Create a results list, filled with 2, 3, and 5
res = [0, 1, 1, 0, 1];

% 2. Create a sieve list with an entry for each positive integer; all entries of
% this list should initially be marked nonprime (composite).
res = [res, zeros(1, limit-5)];

% 3. For each entry number n in the sieve list, with modulo-sixty remainder r:

limitSqrt = floor(sqrt(limit));
for x=1:limitSqrt
    for y=1:limitSqrt
        x2 = x^2;       y2 = y^2;

        % If r is 1, 13, 17, 29, 37, 41, 49, or 53, flip the entry for each
        % possible solution to 4x^2 + y^2 = n.
        n = 4*x2 + y2;
        nMod12 = mod(n, 12); 
        if n <= limit && (nMod12 == 1 || nMod12 == 5)
            res(1, n) = ~res(1, n);
        end

        % If r is 7, 19, 31, or 43, flip the entry for each possible solution
        % to 3x^2 + y^2 = n.
        n = 3*x2 + y2;
        if n <= limit && mod(n, 12) == 7
            res(1, n) = ~res(1, n);
        end

        % If r is 11, 23, 47, or 59, flip the entry for each possible solution
        % to 3x^2 - y^2 = n when x > y.
        if x > y
            n = 3*x2 - y2;
            if n <= limit && mod(n, 12) == 11
                res(1, n) = ~res(1, n);
            end
        end

        % If r is something else, ignore it completely.
    end
end

   % 4. Start with the lowest number in the sieve list.
ndx = 5;
while ndx < limitSqrt
    m = 1;
    if res(ndx)
        % 5. Take the next number in the sieve list still marked prime.
        % 6. Include the number in the results list.
        % 7. Square the number and mark all multiples of that square as nonprime.
        ndx2 = ndx^2;
        ndx2Mult = m * ndx2;
        while ndx2Mult < limit
            res(ndx2Mult) = 0;
            m = m + 1;
            ndx2Mult = m * ndx2;
        end
    end

    % 8. Repeat steps five through eight.
    ndx = ndx + 1;
end

p = find(res); % Find the indexes of nonzerogo
end

Wikipedia pseudocode

// arbitrary search limit
limit ← 1000000         

// initialize the sieve
is_prime(i) ← false, ∀ i ∈ [5, limit] 

// put in candidate primes: 
// integers which have an odd number of
// representations by certain quadratic forms
for (x, y) in [1, √limit] × [1, √limit]:
    n ← 4x²+y²
    if (n ≤ limit) and (n mod 12 = 1 or n mod 12 = 5):
        is_prime(n) ← ¬is_prime(n)
    n ← 3x²+y²
    if (n ≤ limit) and (n mod 12 = 7):
        is_prime(n) ← ¬is_prime(n)
    n ← 3x²-y²
    if (x > y) and (n ≤ limit) and (n mod 12 = 11):
        is_prime(n) ← ¬is_prime(n)

// eliminate composites by sieving
for n in [5, √limit]:
    if is_prime(n):
        // n is prime, omit multiples of its square; this is
        // sufficient because composites which managed to get
        // on the list cannot be square-free
        is_prime(k) ← false, k ∈ {n², 2n², 3n², ..., limit} 

print 2, 3
for n in [5, limit]:
    if is_prime(n): print n
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I guess for matlab you should start with: res = false(5,1) to start like described on wiki. –  Dennis Jaheruddin Feb 15 '13 at 18:12
    
@DennisJaheruddin Or res = [0,1,1,0,0] since we know that 2 and 3 are prime. –  Ricardo Altamirano Feb 15 '13 at 18:22
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Wikipedia's text description of the algorithm, the "results list" and "sieve list" are two different things. Your Matlab code has just one vector used for both. But the initial value in the sieve list for 5 should be "non-prime".

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Nice catch. It's a simple error, but I spent half an hour digging around in the "guts" of my algorithm that I didn't see it right at the top of the code. –  Ricardo Altamirano Feb 16 '13 at 19:55
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Without looking at the code I read this in your description:

so 5 is flipped from prime to nonprime and never flipped back

I guess this is what goes wrong, it should have been initialized as false (thus nonprime) and as it only gets switched once it stays prime.

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