Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When should I use first notation:

var object = {
    a: function() {
        // object.a method body
    },
    b: function() {
        // object.b method body
    },
    c: function() {
        // object.c method body
    },
};

and when the second one?

function Class() {};

Class.prototype.a = function() {
    // object.a method body
};

Class.prototype.b = function() {
    // object.b method body
};

Class.prototype.c = function() {
    // object.c method body
};

var object = new Class();
share|improve this question
2  
The second one won't work. –  SLaks Feb 15 '13 at 18:55
    
Sure, corrected:). –  ciembor Feb 15 '13 at 19:00
    
@ciembor no, you didn't fix it yet. See my answer. –  dystroy Feb 15 '13 at 19:01
    
Possibly answered in stackoverflow.com/questions/14894807/… –  Explosion Pills Feb 15 '13 at 19:02
    
Ahhh, I hate when I write faster than think;). –  ciembor Feb 15 '13 at 19:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The main advantage is that the functions are shared by all instances in second case, which makes the objects lighter. It explicitly defines the objects as instances of what is conceptually a class.

But the correct syntax is

function MyClass(){
}
MyClass.prototype.a = function(){
};
...
var o = new MyClass();

It also allows you to define an inheritance chain :

function OtherClass(){
}
OtherClass.prototype = new MyClass(); // makes OtherClass extend MyClass
OtherClass.prototype.b = function(){
};
...
var o2 = new OtherClass();

o2 has the functions of both OtherClass and MyClass.

The MDN gives more details in its Introduction to Object-Oriented JavaScript.

share|improve this answer
2  
I'd advise to the OP not to use object as a variable name. Seems ripe for error. –  Mathletics Feb 15 '13 at 18:57
    
This is just an outlook example... –  ciembor Feb 15 '13 at 19:03
    
Hum... Why the downvote ? Did I do something wrong ? –  dystroy Feb 15 '13 at 19:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.