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In Solaris, the output of 'netstat -i' gives something like the following:

root# netstat -i
Name  Mtu  Net/Dest      Address        Ipkts   Ierrs Opkts  Oerrs Collis Queue
lo0   8232 loopback      localhost      136799  0     136799 0     0      0
igb0  1500 vulture       vulture        1272272 0     347277 0     0      0

Note that there is a Queue field on the end.

In Linux, 'netstat -i' gives output with no Queue field:

[root@roseate ~]# netstat -i
Kernel Interface table 
Iface       MTU Met    RX-OK RX-ERR RX-DRP RX-OVR    TX-OK TX-ERR TX-DRP TX-OVR Flg
eth0       1500   0  2806170      0      0      0   791768      0      0      0 BMRU
eth1       1500   0        0      0      0      0        0      0      0      0 BMU
eth2       1500   0        0      0      0      0        0      0      0      0 BMU
eth3       1500   0        0      0      0      0        0      0      0      0 BMU
lo        16436   0  1405318      0      0      0  1405318      0      0      0 LRU

I've figured out how to get collisions in Linux by adding the -e option, but is there a way to get the Queue in Linux?

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3 Answers

The only reference to queue I ever saw in netstat on Linux was when using -s, but that's probably too garrulous for your use-case?

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$ netstat -na | awk 'BEGIN { RecvQ=0; SendQ=0; } { RecvQ+=$2; SendQ+=$3; } END { print "RecvQ " RecvQ/1024; print "SendQ " SendQ/1024; }'
RecvQ 255.882
SendQ 0.0507812

For per interface, I have dirty way

[spatel@us04 ~]$  for qw in `/sbin/ifconfig  | grep 'inet addr:' | cut -d: -f2 | awk '{print $1}'`; do echo `/sbin/ip addr | grep $qw | awk '{print $7}'` : ; echo `netstat -na | grep $qw | awk 'BEGIN { RecvQ=0; SendQ=0; } { RecvQ+=$2; SendQ+=$3; } END { print "RecvQ " RecvQ/1024; print "SendQ " SendQ/1024; }'`; done
eth0 :
RecvQ 0 SendQ 0
eth2 :
RecvQ 0.0703125 SendQ 1.56738
:
RecvQ 0 SendQ 0
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Can you please explain what this is doing? Shouldn't there be a queue for each interface? –  Greg Feb 15 '13 at 20:04
    
I use grep my local interface IP address to find out per interface. [spatel@us-wal-db0001 net]$ netstat -na | grep 10.101.50.10 | awk 'BEGIN { RecvQ=0; SendQ=0; } { RecvQ+=$2; SendQ+=$3; } END { print "RecvQ " RecvQ/1024; print "SendQ " SendQ/1024; }' RecvQ 0.00195312 SendQ 0.65625 –  Satish Feb 15 '13 at 20:23
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up using

tc -s -d qdisc

[root@roseate ~]# tc -s -d qdisc
qdisc mq 0: dev eth2 root
Sent 0 bytes 0 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0)
rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0
qdisc mq 0: dev eth3 root
Sent 0 bytes 0 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0)
rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0
qdisc mq 0: dev eth0 root
Sent 218041403 bytes 1358829 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 1)
rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 1
qdisc mq 0: dev eth1 root
Sent 0 bytes 0 pkt (dropped 0, overlimits 0 requeues 0)
rate 0bit 0pps backlog 0b 0p requeues 0

which gives backlog bytes and packets.

Source

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