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I have table with data something like this:

ID     | RowNumber     | Data
------------------------------
1      | 1             | Data
2      | 2             | Data
3      | 3             | Data
4      | 1             | Data
5      | 2             | Data
6      | 1             | Data
7      | 2             | Data
8      | 3             | Data
9      | 4             | Data

I want to group each set of RowNumbers So that my result is something like this:

ID     | RowNumber     | Group | Data
--------------------------------------
1      | 1             | a     | Data
2      | 2             | a     | Data
3      | 3             | a     | Data
4      | 1             | b     | Data
5      | 2             | b     | Data
6      | 1             | c     | Data
7      | 2             | c     | Data
8      | 3             | c     | Data
9      | 4             | c     | Data

The only way I know where each group starts and stops is when the RowNumber starts over. How can I accomplish this? It also needs to be fairly efficient since the table I need to do this on has 52 Million Rows.

Additional Info

ID is truly sequential, but RowNumber may not be. I think RowNumber will always begin with 1 but for example the RowNumbers for group1 could be "1,1,2,2,3,4" and for group2 they could be "1,2,4,6", etc.

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2  
What name should the 27th group get (after z)? –  ypercube Feb 15 '13 at 20:17
    
What are you trying to find from the query? –  Darius X. Feb 15 '13 at 20:30
    
@ypercube it doesn't matter just so long as its unique... number instead of letters would be fine. –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 21:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For the clarified requirements in the comments

The rownumbers for group1 could be "1,1,2,2,3,4" and for group2 they could be "1,2,4,6" ... a higher number followed by a lower would be a new group.

A SQL Server 2012 solution could be as follows.

  1. Use LAG to access the previous row and set a flag to 1 if that row is the start of a new group or 0 otherwise.
  2. Calculate a running sum of these flags to use as the grouping value.

Code

WITH T1 AS
(
SELECT *,
       LAG(RowNumber) OVER (ORDER BY ID) AS PrevRowNumber
FROM YourTable
), T2 AS
(
SELECT *,
       IIF(PrevRowNumber IS NULL OR PrevRowNumber > RowNumber, 1, 0) AS NewGroup
FROM T1
)
SELECT ID,
        RowNumber,
        Data,
        SUM(NewGroup) OVER (ORDER BY ID 
                            ROWS BETWEEN UNBOUNDED PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW) AS  Grp
FROM T2

SQL Fiddle

Assuming ID is the clustered index the plan for this has one scan against YourTable and avoids any sort operations.

Plan

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I think RowNumber will always begin with 1, but it may not be truly sequential. Eg. the rownumbers for group1 could be "1,1,2,2,3,4" and for group2 they could be "1,2,4,6" –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 21:49
    
@matthew - So what denotes a new group then? A higher number followed by a lower number? What version of SQL Server are you on? –  Martin Smith Feb 15 '13 at 21:52
    
Correct, a higher number followed by a lower would be a new group. –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 21:54
    
I'm on SQL Sever 2005. I could move the data to a SQL Server 2012 server if that is easier. –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 21:55
    
@matthew - In SQL Server 2012 it is easier as you can use LAG to access the previous row straight forwardly to set a flag if that row is the start of a new group then do a running total count of those flags to get the grouping value. –  Martin Smith Feb 15 '13 at 22:36

If the ids are truly sequential, you can do:

select t.*,
       (id - rowNumber) as grp
from t
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This looks promising. Id is truly sequential, but RowNumber may not be. Eg. group1 could equal "1,1,2,2,3,4" and group2 could be "1,2,4,6" –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 21:47
    
@matthew - If id is an IDENTITY column then "truly sequential" is not guaranteed. –  Martin Smith Feb 15 '13 at 22:10
    
@MartinSmith I know. I'm adding it to the records, so I can ensure that it truly is. –  matthew Feb 15 '13 at 22:19

Also you can use recursive CTE

 ;WITH cte AS
 (       
  SELECT ID, RowNumber, Data, 1 AS [Group]
  FROM dbo.test1
  WHERE ID = 1
  UNION ALL
  SELECT t.ID, t.RowNumber, t.Data, 
         CASE WHEN t.RowNumber != 1 THEN c.[Group] ELSE c.[Group] + 1 END
  FROM dbo.test1 t JOIN cte c ON t.ID = c.ID + 1
  )
  SELECT *
  FROM cte

Demo on SQLFiddle

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How about:

select ID, RowNumber, Data, dense_rank() over (order by grp) as Grp
from (
     select *, (select min(ID) from [Your Table] where ID > t.ID and RowNumber = 1) as grp
     from [Your Table] t
) t
order by ID

This should work on SQL 2005. You could also use rank() instead if you don't care about consecutive numbers.

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