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This simple method for caching dynamic content uses register_shutdown_function() to push the output buffer to a file on disk after exiting the script. However, I'm using PHP-FPM, with which this doesn't work; a 5-second sleep added to the function indeed causes a 5-second delay in executing the script from the browser. A commenter in the PHP docs notes that there's a special function for PHP-FPM users, namely fastcgi_finish_request(). There's not much documentation for this particular function, however.

The point of fastcgi_finish_request() seems to be to flush all data and proceed with other tasks, but what I want to achieve, as would normally work with register_shutdown_function(), is basically to put the contents of the output buffer into a file without the user having to wait for this to finish.

Is there any way to achieve this under PHP-FPM, with fastcgi_finish_request() or another function?

$timeout = 3600; // cache time-out
$file = '/home/example.com/public_html/cache/' . md5($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']); // unique id for this page
if (file_exists($file) && (filemtime($file) + $timeout) > time()) {
  readfile($file);
  exit();
} else {
  ob_start();
  register_shutdown_function(function () use ($file) {
    // sleep(5);
    $content = ob_get_flush();
    file_put_contents($file, $content);
  });
}
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Why do you need a 5-second sleep? –  Boann Feb 22 '13 at 23:20
    
I don't, it's just to illustrate that the 5-second sleep is visible to the user, when it shouldn't be. –  redburn Feb 23 '13 at 8:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Yes, it's possible to use fastcgi_finish_request for that. You can save this file and see that it works:

<?php

$timeout = 3600; // cache time-out
$file = '/home/galymzhan/www/ps/' . md5($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']); // unique id for this page
if (file_exists($file) && (filemtime($file) + $timeout) > time()) {
  echo "Got this from cache<br>";
  readfile($file);
  exit();
} else {
  ob_start();
  echo "Content to be cached<br>";

  $content = ob_get_flush();
  fastcgi_finish_request();
  // sleep(5);

  file_put_contents($file, $content);
}

Even if you uncomment the line with sleep(5), you'll see that page still opens instantly because fastcgi_finish_request sends data back to browser and then proceeds with whatever code is written after it.

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Thanks for providing a code sample, because I mistook the fastcgi_finish_request function to work similar to register_shutdown, in that I could declare it at the beginning and it, too, would "register shutdown" of the script. Obviously, the difference is that I have to call fastcgi_finish_request at the end of the script, with all the content to be cached in between. It works now! –  redburn Mar 2 '13 at 16:08

First of all, If you cache the dynamic content this way, you're doing it wrong. Surely it can be used this way and it will be able to work, but its totally paralyzed by the approach itself.

if you want to efficiently cache and handle content, create one class and wrap all caching function into.

Yes, you can use fast_cgi_finish_request() like a register_shutdown(). The only difference is that, fast_cgi_finish_request() will send an output(if any) and WILL NOT TERMINATE the script, while an callback of register_shutdown() will be invoked on script termination.

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I'm afraid your answer isn't clear to me. How is this "totally paralyzed be the approach itself"? And what would be the major benefit of wrapping this into a single class? –  redburn Mar 2 '13 at 16:14
    
The major benefit of wrapping into the class is that, you keep strongly separating each responsibility "for its own job", thus implementing a Single Responsibly Principle (google for this). Another thing I'd suggest: If you want a good cache wrapper for dynamic content, look at its popular implementations. (ex: Zend Framework/Cache) Get some ideas from there, then adopt for your own needs. While fastcgi_finish_request() would perfectly work for this, you're clearly breaking SOLID principles. –  bad_boy Mar 5 '13 at 0:24

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