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This is probably is a stupid question and it's really easy to solve, but I am having trouble doing so. My question is, how do I position the two last sections (shown in the picture) below the first ones?

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/829/63128947.jpg/

This is my code:

#main_div{
display: -webkit-box;
-webkit-box-orient: horizontal;
border: 1px solid black;
max-width: 1000px;
}

#main_section{
width: 600px;
height: 450px;
border: 1px solid black;
padding: 5px;
margin: 10px;
}

#sub_section1{
width: 100px;
height: 200px;
border: 1px solid black;
padding: 5px;
margin: 10px;
-webkit-box-flex: 1;
}

#sub_section2{
width: 100px;
height: 200px;
border: 1px solid black;
padding: 5px;
margin: 10px;
-webkit-box-flex: 1;
}

#sub_section3{
width: 100px;
height: 200px;
border: 1px solid black;
padding: 5px;
margin: 10px;
-webkit-box-flex: 1;
}

#sub_section4{
width: 100px;
height: 200px;
border: 1px solid black;
padding: 5px;
margin: 10px;
-webkit-box-flex: 1;
}
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Use float: left on all elements inside of #main_div and constrain #main_div to not have enough space for those two, then they will wrap down to the next line. Another option would be to use the nth-child pseudo-selector, instead of selecting by ID. –  crush Feb 15 '13 at 20:44
    
Read this: amazon.com/Head-First-HTML5-Programming-JavaScript/dp/… It's a LOT quicker and easier to get a good foundation in HTML, rather than keep banging your head against walls and learning that way. –  Monk Jan 12 at 3:14
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a fiddle that demonstrates one way to do it. I simply added another div element (I called it a "sidebar"), and put the smaller divs inside of it. Each element is floated, and the width of the sidebar container is wide enough to contain these elements. You may need to resize the viewport in the fiddle to get things to flow as you have them in your screenshot.

Since your smaller div elements are all styled the same, I opted to use a class instead of multiple ID's. This way you aren't duplicating rules unnecessarily in your CSS.

Also note that this could also probably be achieved with absolute positioning, if you're into that kind of thing. There are usually multiple ways of doing things in CSS.

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Thanks, that worked. –  Adam Miszczak Feb 15 '13 at 21:17
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I just added another layer of conatining divs and called them section_top/bottom. Since divs are block elements, it should push the other two down. I also cleaned up the styles just a little :-).

fiddle

Code:

<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            #main_div{
                display: -webkit-box;
                -webkit-box-orient: horizontal;
                border: 1px solid black;
                max-width: 1000px;
                padding: 5px;
                margin: 10px;
            }

            #main_section{
                width: 600px;
                height: 450px;
                border: 1px solid black;
            }

            .subsection {
                width: 100px;
                height: 200px;
                border: 1px solid black;
                padding: 5px;
                margin: 10px;
                -webkit-box-flex: 1;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="main_div">
            <div id="main_section">

            </div>
            <div id="section_top">
                <div id="sub_section1" class="subsection">

                </div>
                <div id="sub_section2" class="subsection">

                </div>
            </div>
            <div id="section_bottom">
                <div id="sub_section3" class="subsection">

                </div>
                <div id="sub_section4" class="subsection">

                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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