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I am writing an application to continuously write and read files to a drive (whether it's hard drive or SD card or whatever). I'm writing a certain pattern and then reading it back as verification. I want to immediately output some kind of blaring error as soon as the app fails. Basically we're hitting the hardware with radiation and need to detect when it fails. I have the app reading & writing the files just fine so far, but can yank the SD card mid execution and it keeps on running as if it's still there. I really need to detect the moment that SD card is removed. I've seen some suggesting using libudev. I cannot use that as this is on an embedded linux system which doesn't have it. Here's the code I have so far:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

const unsigned long long size = 16ULL*1024;
#define NANOS 1000000000LL
#define KB 1024

long long CreateFile(char* filename)
{
    struct timespec time_start;
    struct timespec time_stop;
    long long start, elapsed, microseconds;
    int timefail = 0;
    size_t stat;

    if(clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &time_start) < 0)
        timefail = 1;
    start = time_start.tv_sec*NANOS + time_start.tv_nsec;

    int a[size];
    int i, j;

    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
        a[i] = i;

    FILE* pFile;
    pFile = fopen(filename, "wb");
    if(pFile < 0)
    {
        perror("fopen");
        return -1;
    }
    for(j=0; j < KB; j++)
    {
        stat = fwrite(a, sizeof(int), size, pFile);
        if(stat < 0)
            perror("fwrite");
        stat = fsync(pFile);
        //if(stat)
        //  perror("fysnc");
    }

fclose(pFile);

    if(clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &time_stop) < 0)
        timefail = 1;

    elapsed = time_stop.tv_sec*NANOS + time_stop.tv_nsec - start;
    microseconds = elapsed / 1000 + (elapsed % 1000 >= 500);

    if(timefail)
        return -1;

    return microseconds / 1000;
}

long long ReadFile(char* filename)
{
    struct timespec time_start;
    struct timespec time_stop;
    long long start, elapsed, microseconds;
    int timefail = 0;

    if(clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &time_start) < 0)
        timefail = 1;
    start = time_start.tv_sec*NANOS + time_start.tv_nsec;

    FILE* pFile;
    pFile = fopen(filename, "rb");

    int a[KB];
    int i=0, j=0;
    for(i=0; i<size; i++)
    {
        if(ferror(pFile) != 0)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "**********************************************");
            fprintf(stderr, "READ FAILURE\n");
            fclose(pFile);
            return -1;
        }
        fread(a, sizeof(a), 1, pFile);
        for(j=0; j<KB;j++)
        {
            if(a[0] != a[1]-1)
            {
                fprintf(stderr, "**********************************************");
                fprintf(stderr, "DATA FAILURE, %d != %d\n", a[j], a[j+1]-1);
                fclose(pFile);
                return -1;
            }
        }
    }
    fclose(pFile);
    if(clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &time_stop) < 0)
            timefail = 1;

    if(timefail)
        return -1;

    elapsed = time_stop.tv_sec*NANOS + time_stop.tv_nsec - start;
    microseconds = elapsed / 1000 + (elapsed % 1000 >= 500);

    return microseconds/1000;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char* filenamebase = "/tmp/media/mmcblk0p1/test.file";
    char filename[100] = "";
    int i=0;
    long long tmpsec = 0;
    long long totalwritetime = 0;
    int totalreadtime = 0;
    int numfiles = 10;
    int totalwritten = 0;
    int totalread = 0;

    for(i=0;i<numfiles;i++)
    {
        sprintf(filename, "%s%d", filenamebase, i);
        fprintf(stderr, "Writing File: %s ...", filename);
        tmpsec = CreateFile(filename);
        if(tmpsec < 0)
            return 0;
        totalwritetime += tmpsec;
        totalwritten++;
        fprintf(stderr, "completed in %lld seconds\n", tmpsec);
        fprintf(stderr, "Reading File: %s ...", filename);
        tmpsec = ReadFile(filename);
        if(tmpsec < 0)
            return 0;
        totalreadtime += tmpsec;
        totalread++;
        fprintf(stderr, "completed in %lld seconds\n", tmpsec);
    }

    fprintf(stderr, "Test Complete\nTotal Files: %d written, %d read\n", totalwritten, totalread);
    fprintf(stderr, "File Size: %lld KB\n", size);
    fprintf(stderr, "Total KBytes Written: %lld\n", size*totalwritten);
    fprintf(stderr, "Average Write Speed: %0.2f KBps\n", (double)size*totalwritten/(totalwritetime/1000));
    fprintf(stderr, "Total KBytes Read: %lld\n", size*totalread);
    fprintf(stderr, "Average Read Speed: %0.2f KBps\n", (double)size*totalread/(totalreadtime/1000));

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Ok I pretty much give up trying to get the stupid code to paste properly. Not sure why that doesn't work. –  Chuck Claunch Feb 15 '13 at 21:37
    
perror does call exit? –  neagoegab Feb 15 '13 at 21:44
1  
if it does not there is your error... If fwrite/fsync returns an error you should break the loop. –  neagoegab Feb 15 '13 at 21:46
    
fwrite/fsync return errors 100% of the time. but nevertheless the files are written and read properly when the card is plugged in. If I unplug the device, the program continues to run as if it's writing the files. I'm completely baffled as to this behavior. (Mats thanks for the code edit). –  Chuck Claunch Feb 15 '13 at 21:54
2  
But the program is made that way... you don't even check the return code of fread(in the read function)... In order to have a correct behavior: in your write function you should break the write loop if an error occurs. In the read function you should check if fread returned an error... –  neagoegab Feb 15 '13 at 21:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll need to change your approach.

If you yank out media that has been mounted, you're likely to panic your kernel (as it keeps complex data structures that represent the mounted filesystem in memory), and break the media itself.

I've destroyed quite a few USB memory sticks that way -- their internal small logic that handle allocation and wear leveling do not like to lose power mid-run, and the cheapest ones do not seem to have capacitors capable of providing enough power to keep them running long enough to ensure a consistent state -- but SD cards and more expensive USB sticks might survive better.

Depending on the drivers used, the kernel may allow you to read and write to the media, but simply keep the changes in page cache. (Furthermore, your stdio.h I/O is likely to only reach into the page cache, and not the actual media, depending on the mount options (whether mounted direct/sync or not). Your approach simply does not provide the behaviour you assume it does.)

Instead, you should use low-level I/O (unistd.h, see man 2 open and related calls, none of stdio.h), using O_RDWR|O_DIRECT|O_SYNC flags to make sure your reads and writes hit the hardware, and access the raw media directly via the block device node, instead of mounting it at all. You can also read/write to random locations on the device, in the hopes that wear leveling does not affect your radiation resistance checks too much.

(Edited to add: If you write in blocks exactly the size of the native allocation block for the tested media device, you'll avoid the slow read-modify-write cycles on the device. The device will still do wear leveling, but that just means that the block you wrote is in a random physical location(s) in the flash chip. The native block size depends on the media device. It is possible to measure the native block size by observing how long it takes to read and write a block of different size, but I think for damage testing, a large enough power of two should work best -- say 256k or 262144 bytes. It's probably best to let the user set it for each device separately, and use either manufacturer-provided information, or a separate test program to find out the proper value.)

You do not want to use mmap() for this, as the SIGBUS signal caused by media errors and media becoming unavailable, is very tricky to handle correctly. Low-level unistd.h I/O is best for this, in my opinion.

I believe, but have not verified, that yanking out the media in mid-read/write to the unmounted low-level device, should simply yield a read/write error. (I don't have any media I'm willing to risk right now to check it, though :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll give that a look. Will probably be working on this tomorrow. –  Chuck Claunch Feb 15 '13 at 22:00
    
Ok, @ChuckClaunch. The actual test application should be very simple (I'd use Xorshift to generate random data written to the media), and have it be a destructive test (wiping/garbling the entire media device being tested). If you haven't used low-level I/O before, I think I could show some example code on how to do the open()/read()/write() with correct error checking to a raw block device. –  Nominal Animal Feb 15 '13 at 22:04
    
Thanks, that helped, as I was able to at least get the operation to hang when the card was removed. That's better than it continuing on as if the card was still there. Would still like to get it to immediately error out if that happens but this should suffice. Thanks! –  Chuck Claunch Feb 19 '13 at 15:18
    
@ChuckClaunch: Use a timeout timer to raise a signal after a short period (but longer than normal reads/writes), and set a trivial signal handler (empty body) for that signal. The delivery of the signal will interrupt the blocking I/O call. It's best to have the timer repeat at a very short interval after the initial timeout, so that in case of a short read/write, you can detect the timeout. It is not immediate, but it should be pretty robust. –  Nominal Animal Feb 19 '13 at 17:12

Answer from my comment:

In your write function you should have:

for(j=0; j < KB; j++)
{
    uint32_t bytes_written = fwrite(a, sizeof(int), size, pFile);
    if(bytes_written < size)
    {
        perror("fwrite");
        break;
    }
    stat = fsync(pFile);
    if(stat < 0)
    {
        perror("fysnc");
        break;
    }
}

and in your read function:

uint32_t read_bytes_count = fread(a, sizeof(a), 1, pFile);
if(read_bytes_count < sizeof(a))
    break;

Also if you have a C99 compiler please use the fixed size types available in stdint.h, ex: uint32_t, ...

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the code, that definitely helped. I had to accept Nominal's answer though as it's the low level calls that helped me out. –  Chuck Claunch Feb 19 '13 at 15:19

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