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  1. select account_no, amount, customer from transactions where branch = 'Pennywell'

  2. select c.customer_name, c.cust_street, c.cust_city, b.branch_name, b.branch_city, a.account_no, a.balance from customer c, transactions t, accounts a, branch b where t.customer = c.customer_name and a.account_no = t.account_no and b.branch_name = a.branch_name

  3. select customer_name, cust_city from customer where customer_name not in (select customer from transactions)

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1 Answer 1

The first one is just selection on Pennywell followed by projection on account_no, amount, customer:

\pi_{account_no, amount, customer} (\sigma_branch = 'Pennywell'(transactions))

The second one follows the same principle:

  1. List all your tables:

customer, transactions, accounts, branch

  1. Rename each one of the using \rho:

\rho_c(customer), \rho_t(transactions), \rho_a(accounts), \rho_b(branch)

  1. Calculate the Cartesian product

\rho_c(customer) x \rho_t(transactions) x \rho_a(accounts) x \rho_b(branch)

  1. Perform the selection ("where") on the result of step 3 replacing and by conjunctions, or by disjunctions and not by negations:

\sigma_{t.customer = c.customer_name /\ a.account_no = t.account_no /\ b.branch_name = a.branch_name}(\rho_c(customer) x \rho_t(transactions) x \rho_a(accounts) x \rho_b(branch))

  1. Finally perform the projection:

\pi_{c.customer_name, c.cust_street, c.cust_city, b.branch_name, b.branch_city, a.account_no, a.balance}(\sigma_{t.customer = c.customer_name /\ a.account_no = t.account_no /\ b.branch_name = a.branch_name}(\rho_c(customer) x \rho_t(transactions) x \rho_a(accounts) x \rho_b(branch)))

The last query is a bit more tricky and it involves a bit more thinking.

\pi_{customer_name}(transactions)

are all the customers we want to ignore and

\pi_{customer_name}(customer)

are all customers. Hence,

\pi_{customer_name}(customer) - \pi_{customer_name}(transactions)

are all those we want to keep. Finally we need to find their cities (for the sake of simplicity I'm using the join operator |x|):

\pi_{customer_name, cust_city}((\pi_{customer_name}(customer) - \pi_{customer_name}(transactions)) |x| customer)

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please what is the meaning of |x| cos I don't understand –  chidoskychidosky Feb 16 '13 at 2:12
    
|x| is the natural join operator. From Wikipedia: "The result of the natural join is the set of all combinations of tuples in R and S that are equal on their common attribute names." –  Alexander Serebrenik Feb 16 '13 at 14:06

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