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List all the files that do not contain 2 different strings

I have a dir with numerous files named in a pattern e.g file1.txt

I can list all the files that do not contain one string

grep -l "String" file*

How can I list files that do not contain two strings I tried?

grep -l "string1|string2" file*
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Do you mean to use the -L option (-l shows files whose contents do match the given regular expression)? –  chepner Feb 15 '13 at 21:45
    
If a file contains just one of the 2 strings should that file's name be printed or not? Also, if string1 contained "f.o" and the string "flo" existed in a file, should that be considered a match or not? –  Ed Morton Feb 16 '13 at 13:30
    
Yes i am trying to list the files that do not contain either string –  Paul33 Feb 18 '13 at 16:49
    
@EdMorton not only files that contain neither string should be returned –  Paul33 Feb 19 '13 at 16:24
    
@Paul33 OK, I just updated my answer. –  Ed Morton Feb 19 '13 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

You need the parameter e for grep, or using egrep.

With egrep:

egrep -L "string1|string2" file*
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Or, just escape the "|": grep -l "string1\|string2" –  chepner Feb 15 '13 at 21:44
    
Nice! I did not know that. I was thinking in grep -l -e "string1|string2" –  fedorqui Feb 15 '13 at 21:46
    
egrep makes it easier to type, as it is probably more common to use | as the alternation operator than as literal text. –  chepner Feb 15 '13 at 21:48
    
@chepner has already commented that it should be -L for listing files not containing pattern. –  sotapme Feb 15 '13 at 22:01
    
Thank you for letting me now. I update my answer to reflect it. –  fedorqui Feb 15 '13 at 22:03

Assuming you want to just print the names of files that contain ALL strings, here's a solution that will work for any number of strings and will do a string comparison, not a regular expression comparison:

gawk -v RS='\0' -v strings="string1 string2" '
BEGIN{ numStrings = split(strings,stringsA) }
{
   matchCnt = 0
   for (stringNr=1; stringNr<=numStrings; stringNr++)
      if ( index($0,stringsA[stringNr]) )
         matchCnt++
}
matchCnt == numStrings { print FILENAME }
' file*

Hang on, I just noticed you want to print the files that do NOT contain 2 strings. That would be:

gawk -v RS='\0' -v strings="string1 string2" '
BEGIN{ numStrings = split(strings,stringsA) }
{
   matchCnt = 0
   for (stringNr=1; stringNr<=numStrings; stringNr++)
      if ( index($0,stringsA[stringNr]) )
         matchCnt++
}
matchCnt == numStrings { matchesAll[FILENAME] }
END {
   for (fileNr=1; fileNr < ARGC; fileNr++) {
      file = ARGV[fileNr]
      if (! (file in matchesAll) )
         print file
   }
}
' file*

To print the names of the files that contain neither string would be:

gawk -v RS='\0' -v strings="string1 string2" '
BEGIN{ numStrings = split(strings,stringsA) }
{
   for (stringNr=1; stringNr<=numStrings; stringNr++)
      if ( index($0,stringsA[stringNr]) )
         matchesOne[FILENAME]
}
END {
   for (fileNr=1; fileNr < ARGC; fileNr++) {
      file = ARGV[fileNr]
      if (! (file in matchesOne) )
         print file
   }
}
' file*
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