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The follow code will eat content in @populations

@populations=("EUR","AFR","ASN","AMR");
print @populations,"\n";  #will show EURAFRASNAMR
foreach (@populations)
{  
    $filepath="tmp.txt"; #whatever text file you like 
    open(FILE,"<$filepath");
    while(<FILE>)
    {   
    }   
}   
print @populations,"\n";   #will print nothing

if change to

foreach $i (@populations)

then the array will not be eaten.

or if mark the while loop, the array will not be eaten.

I am not a perl guru, but have several years experience.

can anyone tell me why? is it a bug of perl?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
while (<$fh>) { ... }

gets replaced with

while (defined($_ = <$fh>)) { ... }

which is why the value read is available in $_. The catch is that $_ is currently aliased to an element of @populations.

As you said, you can avoid that problem by using

for my $population (@populations) {  
   ...
   while (<FILE>) { ... $_ ... }
   ...
}

But that can still clobber $_ from the calling sub. Here are two more robust fixes:

for (@populations) {  # Or: for my $population (@populations) {  
   ...
   while (my $line = <FILE>) { ... $line ... }
   ...
}   

or

for (@populations) {  # Or: for my $population (@populations) {  
   ...
   while (local $_ = <FILE>) { ... $_ ... }
   ...
}

For exactly the same reason, you shouldn't use global variables for file handles.

$filepath="tmp.txt"; #whatever text file you like 
open(FILE,"<$filepath");
<FILE>

should be

my $filepath="tmp.txt";
open(my $FILE, "<", $filepath) or die $!;
<$fh>

By the way, always use use strict; use warnings;.

share|improve this answer

Not a bug exactly, but it is a trap for the unwary. You are implicitly assigning the elements of @populations to the $_ variable, and then you are reading data from the FILE filehandle into $_, overwriting the contents of @populations.

More explicitly, your code is equivalent to:

@populations=("EUR","AFR","ASN","AMR");
print @populations,"\n";  #will show EURAFRASNAMR
foreach $_ (@populations)    # $_ becomes "aliased" to the element in @populations
{  
    $filepath="tmp.txt"; #whatever text file you like 
    open(FILE,"<$filepath");
    while(defined($_ = <FILE>))  # overwrites $_, and erases element in @populations
    {   
    }   
}   
print @populations,"\n";   #will print nothing

You found a good workaround, which is to avoid using $_ implicitly in a for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys! –  user1143669 Feb 15 '13 at 22:10

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