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I have written an action filter which detects a new session and attempts to redirect the user to a page informing them that this has happened. The only problem is I can not figure out how to make it redirect to a controller/action combo in an action filter. I can instead only figure out how to redirect to a specified url. Is there a direct way to redirect to a controller/action combo in an action filter in mvc2?

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3 Answers

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Rather than getting a reference to HttpContent and redirecting directly in the ActionFilter you can set the Result of the filter context to be a RedirectToRouteResult. It's a bit cleaner and better for testing.

Like this:

public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
{
    if(something)
    {
        filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(
            new RouteValueDictionary {{ "Controller", "YourController" },
                                      { "Action", "YourAction" } });
    }

    base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
}
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1  
My head was hurting, now it's not. Thanks –  jolySoft Nov 16 '11 at 11:44
2  
This is a much more appropriate answer than mine. This was my first question on MVC and today I would answer it like this. –  NickLarsen Jan 10 '12 at 12:56
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EDIT: The original question was about how to detect session logout, and then automatically redirect to a specified controller and action. The question proved much more useful as it's current form however.


I ended up using a combination of items to achieve this goal.

First is the session expire filter found here. Then I wanted someway to specify the controller/action combo to get a redirect URL, which I found plenty of examples of here. In the end I came up with this:

public class SessionExpireFilterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public String RedirectController { get; set; }
    public String RedirectAction { get; set; }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        HttpContext ctx = HttpContext.Current;

        if (ctx.Session != null)
        {
            if (ctx.Session.IsNewSession)
            {
                string sessionCookie = ctx.Request.Headers["Cookie"];
                if ((null != sessionCookie) && (sessionCookie.IndexOf("ASP.NET_SessionId") >= 0))
                {
                    UrlHelper helper = new UrlHelper(filterContext.RequestContext);
                    String url = helper.Action(this.RedirectAction, this.RedirectController);
                    ctx.Response.Redirect(url);
                }
            }
        }

        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }
}
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7  
If you want to make this more testable, I believe you can simply set filterContext.Result to a RedirectResult, rather than explicitly redirecting. The net result is that MVC will still perform the redirect, but that way you can write unit tests that manually invoke OnActionExecuting() and then assert against filterContext.Result. –  Seth Petry-Johnson Jan 5 '10 at 19:38
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Call RedirectToAction using this overload:

protected internal RedirectToRouteResult RedirectToAction(
    string actionName,
    RouteValueDictionary routeValues
)

In Action Filters, the story is a little different. For a good example, see here:

http://www.dotnetspider.com/resources/29440-ASP-NET-MVC-Action-filters.aspx

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That is a good place to look for redirecting in an action filter (+1), but I really want specify the controller/action combo to my filter. I also didn't want to just concatenate strings in case of custom routing, but I ended up finding something that could help. See my answer. –  NickLarsen Oct 1 '09 at 13:18
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