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I have some monthly weather data that I want to insert into an Oracle database table but I want to insert the corresponding records in a batch in order to be more efficient. Can anyone advise as to how I'd go about doing this in Python?

For example let's say my table has four fields: a station ID, a date, and two value fields. The records are uniquely identified by the station ID and date fields (composite key). The values I'll have to insert for each station will be kept in a list with X number of full years worth of data, so for example if there are two years of values then the value lists will contain 24 values.

I assume that below is the way I'd do this if I wanted to insert the records one at a time:

connection_string = "scott/tiger@testdb"
connection = cx_Oracle.Connection(connection_string)
cursor = cx_Oracle.Cursor(connection)
station_id = 'STATION_1'
start_year = 2000

temps = [ 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 1, 3 ]
precips = [ 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, 4, 6, 8 ]
number_of_years = len(temps) / 12
for i in range(number_of_years):
    for j in range(12):
        # make a date for the first day of the month
        date_value = datetime.date(start_year + i, j + 1, 1)
        index = (i * 12) + j
        sql_insert = 'insert into my_table (id, date_column, temp, precip) values (%s, %s, %s, %s)', (station_id, date_value, temps[index], precips[index]))
        cursor.execute(sql_insert)
connection.commit()

Is there a way to do what I'm doing above but in a way that performs a batch insert in order to increase efficiency? BTW my experience is with Java/JDBC/Hibernate so if someone can give an explanation/example which compares to the Java approach then it'd be especially helpful.

EDIT: Perhaps I need to use cursor.executemany() as described here?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions, comments, etc.

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2  
Use the .executemany() call instead? –  Martijn Pieters Feb 15 '13 at 22:05
    
Yes, Martijn, I just found that (and updated/edited the question to include it) and it does look to be the solution to this problem. Thanks for your input! –  James Adams Feb 15 '13 at 22:11
    
Use one query with INSERT ALL to insert multiple rows at once. –  Jesse Feb 15 '13 at 22:17
1  
.executemany() is not a batch update; you will do as many DML statements as you have cursor you execute... It makes you Python code cleaner but it is not more forgiving to the database. What does your original data look like; is it entered by a user and so stored in variables in your code or is it in a text file etc.? –  Ben Feb 15 '13 at 22:36
    
Thanks, Ben. The data is computed and stored in list variables. So in the simple example above the temps and precips lists would actually be computed in my Python code before we reach this section instead of assigned as in the example code. –  James Adams Feb 15 '13 at 23:59
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's what I've come up with which appears to work well (but please comment if there's a way to improve this):

# build rows for each date and add to a list of rows we'll use to insert as a batch 
rows = [] 
numberOfYears = endYear - startYear + 1
for i in range(numberOfYears):
    for j in range(12):
        # make a date for the first day of the month
        dateValue = datetime.date(startYear + i, j + 1, 1)
        index = (i * 12) + j
        row = (stationId, dateValue, temps[index], precips[index])
        rows.append(row)

# insert all of the rows as a batch and commit
ip = '192.1.2.3' 
port = 1521
SID = 'my_sid'
dsn = cx_Oracle.makedsn(ip, port, SID)
connection = cx_Oracle.connect('username', 'password', dsn)
cursor = cx_Oracle.Cursor(connection)
cursor.prepare('insert into ' + database_table_name + ' (id, record_date, temp, precip) values (:1, :2, :3, :4)')
cursor.executemany(None, rows)
connection.commit()
cursor.close()
connection.close()
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Use Cursor.prepare() and Cursor.executemany().

From the cx_Oracle documentation:

Cursor.prepare(statement[, tag])

This can be used before a call to execute() to define the statement that will be executed. When this is done, the prepare phase will not be performed when the call to execute() is made with None or the same string object as the statement. [...]

Cursor.executemany(statement, parameters)

Prepare a statement for execution against a database and then execute it against all parameter mappings or sequences found in the sequence parameters. The statement is managed in the same way as the execute() method manages it.

Thus, using the above two functions, your code becomes:

connection_string = "scott/tiger@testdb"
connection = cx_Oracle.Connection(connection_string)
cursor = cx_Oracle.Cursor(connection)
station_id = 'STATION_1'
start_year = 2000

temps = [ 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 1, 3 ]
precips = [ 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, 4, 6, 8, 2, 4, 6, 8 ]
number_of_years = len(temps) / 12

# list comprehension of dates for the first day of the month
date_values = [datetime.date(start_year + i, j + 1, 1) for i in range(number_of_years) for j in range(12)]

# second argument to executemany() should be of the form:
# [{'1': value_a1, '2': value_a2}, {'1': value_b1, '2': value_b2}]
dict_sequence = [{'1': date_values[i], '2': temps[i], '3': precips[i]} for i in range(1, len(temps))]

sql_insert = 'insert into my_table (id, date_column, temp, precip) values (%s, :1, :2, :3)', station_id)
cursor.prepare(sql_insert)
cursor.executemany(None, dict_sequence)
connection.commit()

Also see Oracle's Mastering Oracle+Python series of articles.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. I've tried the above but it doesn't work due to the fact that executemany() only takes two arguments. And it seems that you still have to create a list of rows to use as the sequence parameters argument, as described in the section titled "Many at Once" here: oracle.com/technetwork/articles/dsl/… and the sections describing the use of executemany() here: oracle.com/technetwork/articles/dsl/… –  James Adams Feb 16 '13 at 0:56
    
Also it's not clear how using a prepare() gains you anything since according to the cx_Oracle.Cursor.execute() documentation: "A reference to the statement will be retained by the cursor. If None or the same string object is passed in again, the cursor will execute that statement again without performing a prepare or rebinding and redefining." But I may be misunderstanding something here... –  James Adams Feb 16 '13 at 1:00
    
Using prepare() doesn't gain you anything, it just makes your code clearer; the underlying C code for either method is the same. As for your first comment, I updated my answer to address that: executemany() takes a sequence of dictionaries as the second argument. –  alldayremix Feb 20 '13 at 1:42
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