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I have a script that contains a couple of variables that need to be set as an environment variable

The list of variables change constantly and modifying it on my end is not an option. Any idea how I would go about doing it?

sample file foo.sh

FOO="FOOFOO"
BAR="BARBAR"
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2 Answers

There is a difference between a variable and an environment variable. If you execute . foo.sh and foo.sh contains the line FOO=value, then the variable FOO will be assigned in the current process. It is not an environment variable. To become a variable, it must be exported. However, shells provide an option which makes all variable assignments promote the variable to an environment variable, so if you simply do:

set -a
. foo.sh
set +a

then all variable assignments in foo.sh will be made make environment variables in the current process.

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Are you looking for the '.' command (also spelled 'source' in bash):

source foo.sh

Since you need to export them to the environment as well, you may need to do a little extra work:

while read -r line; do
    export "$line"
done < foo.sh
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I created another script bar.sh that has source foo.sh while read line; do export "$line" done < foo.sh But after running bar.sh, I still get an empty string when I try to echo $FOO. None of my variables in foo.sh show up in printenv as well –  user2077092 Feb 15 '13 at 22:30
    
You would need to source bar.sh as well to affect the current environment. –  chepner Feb 15 '13 at 22:32
    
Also, the while loop is instead of source foo.sh; you don't need both. It's not wrong, just redundant. –  chepner Feb 15 '13 at 22:33
    
awesome. thanks! –  user2077092 Feb 15 '13 at 22:42
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