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I want to disable the use of rm except in certain circumstances. I wrote a function called remove in a .sh file and it goes though certain checks that I wanted to impose before actually calling rm. However, one could still go into the terminal and simply call the rm function rather than using remove. Is there a way to disable the rmfunction except when called by remove? I want it to be as if the rm function doesn't "exist" to a user who logs into the terminal, all that "exists" is the remove function.

Maybe even go a step further and when a user calls rm it prints to the screen a statement saying to use remove.

As a more broad question, is there a way to disable terminal commands except in certain circumstances? I know I could just make an alias for rm to require root, but that's the easy and less convenient way out.

#!/bin/bash

function rm {
  if [ $# -le 0 ]; then
    echo "Error: no arguments specified."
  else
    hasDir=0
    for arg in "$@"; do
      if [ -d "$arg" ]; then hasDir=1; fi
    done

    ac="Action canceled."
    resp=("y" "n" "e")

    sure=" "
    while [ "$sure" != "y" ] && [ "$sure" != "n" ]; do
      read -p "PERMANENT ACTION.  Are you sure? (y/n): " sure
    done

    if [ "$sure" == "n" ]; then echo "$ac"; return; fi


    if [ $hasDir -eq 1 ]; then
      direc=" "
      validResp=0
      while [ $validResp -eq 0 ]; do
        read -p "Remove all sub-directories? (y/n/e): " direc
        for ans in "${resp[@]}"; do
          if [ "$direc" == "$ans" ]; then validResp=1; fi
        done
      done

      if [ "$direc" == "e" ]; then echo "$ac"; return; fi
    else
      direc="n"
    fi



    check=" "
    validResp=0
    while [ $validResp -eq 0 ]; do
      read -p "Verify removal of each file? (y/n): " check
      for ans in "${resp[@]}"; do
        if [ "$check" == "$ans" ]; then validResp=1; fi
      done
    done

    if [ "$check" == "e" ]; then echo "$ac"; return; fi


    if [ "$direc" == "n" ]; then
      if [ "$check" == "n" ]; then
        for file in "$@"; do
          if [ ! -d "$file" ]; then command rm -f "$file"; fi
        done
      else 
        for file in "$@"; do
          if [ ! -d "$file" ]; then command rm -i "$file"; fi
        done
      fi
    else
      if [ "$check" == "n" ]; then
        command rm -rf "$@"
      else
        command rm -ir "$@"
      fi
    fi
  fi    
}
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closed as off topic by Joni, chepner, shellter, cHao, Graviton Feb 19 '13 at 3:01

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2  
I'd worry about all those scripts that you're unaware of that use rm - from cron and init* etc. Could you not just change the PATH to have your rm first it wouldn't stop people doing /bin/rmthough. –  sotapme Feb 15 '13 at 23:58
1  
rm is an executable, not a shell command or function. Keep in mind that there are other shells besides bash. Running zsh, for instance, would circumvent any shell-based obstacles you tried to create. –  chepner Feb 16 '13 at 0:12
    
the issue is I can't name my function rm, because it goes into a recursive state. That's why I have to name it something else, specifically remove. –  nick Feb 16 '13 at 0:14
    
The reason I want to do this is not for security reasons or anything like that, its more just for the knowledge of being able to do it. And to keep me from accidentally using rm haha. –  nick Feb 16 '13 at 0:17
    
While cleaning up the indentation, I noticed you seem to be missing a fi in your script. –  chepner Feb 16 '13 at 14:22

4 Answers 4

You can override rm (or any other command); the command built-in lets you access the original command when necessary.

rm () {
    # Do something in addition to removing the file

    command rm "$@"
}

command disables shell function look-up.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for command –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 16 '13 at 1:21
    
I added my code in the original post. When I add command I get the error message "rm: missing operand" –  nick Feb 16 '13 at 2:37

You can use dpkg-divert to install a different rm on your system.

See also this article Replacing binaries with dpkg-divert for an example using a shell script.

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Here is a solution, its a bit weird way but works exactly the way you want.

create a directory in your home folder

$~ mkdir ~/myrm

$~ cd ~/myrm

create a symbolic link rm to your remove binary

$~ ln -s /path/to/remove rm

Now the above command will create a link rm which points to remove basically you are invoking remove by calling rm. Make sure that executable permission is given on rm else use

$~ chmod 0777 rm

Now its time to put the path in the $PATH variable.

$~ PATH=~/myrm/:$PATH

make sure that its ~/myrm:$PATH not $PATH:myrm. So now whenever you call rm it will search for rm in ~/myrm directory and invoke it.

share|improve this answer
    
chmod 0777 is very bad advice! This allows anyone to modify your script. If you want to make it executable, use chmod a+x rm instead. –  Olaf Dietsche Feb 16 '13 at 15:15
    
ya 0777 is a bad idea. 0644 would be perfect here.. –  Sagar Sakre Feb 19 '13 at 6:26

If you want to capture all uses of rm, then there is one way. However, I must mention that it's a dirty, not-recommended way.

mv /bin/rm /bin/rm.bak
cp my_rm_script /bin/rm

my_rm_script should contain call to /bin/rm.bak, instead of /bin/rm.

This will capture all calls to command rm.

However, this will not work on busybox type architecture, where the NAME of the binary also matters.

share|improve this answer
    
this sounds way dirty to me. not sure if I should be changing things like that. –  nick Feb 16 '13 at 16:05

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