Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to format a price in JavaScript.
I'd like a function which takes a float as an argument and returns a string formatted like this:

"$ 2,500.00"

What's the best way to do this?

UPDATE: This is my preferred method:

var DecimalSeparator = Number("1.2").toLocaleString().substr(1,1);

var AmountWithCommas = Amount.toLocaleString();
var arParts = String(AmountWithCommas).split(DecimalSeparator);
var intPart = arParts[0];
var decPart = (arParts.length > 1 ? arParts[1] : '');
decPart = (decPart + '00').substr(0,2);

return '£ ' + intPart + DecimalSeparator + decPart;
share|improve this question
2  
Does locale need to be taken into account? –  Mark Biek Sep 29 '08 at 15:10
97  
Please, to anyone reading this in the future, do not use float to store currency. You will loose precision and data. You should store it as a integer number of cents (or pennies etc.) and then convert prior to output. –  Philip Whitehouse Mar 4 '12 at 13:35
3  
@user1308743 Float doesn't store decimal places. It stores numbers using a value, base and offset. 0.01 is not actually representable. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_point#Accuracy_problems –  Philip Whitehouse Jun 10 '12 at 11:11
3  
@user1308743: Imagine you represent a very big number (lets say you are a lucky guy and it is your bank account balance). Would you really want to loose money because of a precision deficiency ? –  ereOn Aug 6 '12 at 9:14
1  
@PhilipWhitehouse is right: it's definitely a bad idea to store money as floats. However, storing money as cents only works when you're dealing only in whole cents, which isn't precise enough for a lot of operations. We've recently switched to storing currencies as a 'Big Decimal', of 7 decimal places. You can use Javascript's toFixed(7) method to emulate this, though it returns a string by necessity. It does mean you can deal in familiar $xx.xx formats, though, without converting back from cents. –  Beejamin May 15 '13 at 23:52

36 Answers 36

You can use :

  var profits=2489.8237
  profits.toFixed(3) //returns 2489.824 (round up)
  profits.toFixed(2) //returns 2489.82
  profits.toFixed(7) //returns 2489.8237000 (padding)

Then you can add the sign of '$'.

If you require ',' for thousand you can use:

Number.prototype.formatMoney = function(c, d, t){
var n = this, 
    c = isNaN(c = Math.abs(c)) ? 2 : c, 
    d = d == undefined ? "." : d, 
    t = t == undefined ? "," : t, 
    s = n < 0 ? "-" : "", 
    i = parseInt(n = Math.abs(+n || 0).toFixed(c)) + "", 
    j = (j = i.length) > 3 ? j % 3 : 0;
   return s + (j ? i.substr(0, j) + t : "") + i.substr(j).replace(/(\d{3})(?=\d)/g, "$1" + t) + (c ? d + Math.abs(n - i).toFixed(c).slice(2) : "");
 };

And use it with :

(123456789.12345).formatMoney(2, '.', ',');

If you're always going to use '.' and ',', you can leave them off your method call, the method will default them for you.

(123456789.12345).formatMoney(2);

If your culture has the two symbols flipped (i.e. Europeans), just paste over the following two lines in the formatMoney method:

    d = d == undefined ? "," : d, 
    t = t == undefined ? "." : t, 
share|improve this answer
11  
formatMoney is poetry, thanks and +1. BTW: if one day you have some spare time I wrote again your code as an answer below. I added some comments and minor consideartion, plz have a look and let me know your thoughts. –  Marco Demaio May 19 '10 at 14:49
12  
first of all, excellent, concise code. however, if you are american, you should change the defaults of d and t to be . and , respectively so that you don't have to specify them every time. also, i recommend modifying the beginning of the return statement to read: return s + '$' + [rest], otherwise you will not get a dollar sign. –  Jason Jan 31 '11 at 23:58
187  
Not sure why people think this code is beautiful. It is indecipherable. It seems to work nicely, but it is not beautiful. –  usr Oct 24 '12 at 16:28
52  
When did obscurity become beautiful? –  Connell Watkins Dec 12 '12 at 16:47
59  
"poetry"? More like obscurity. This isn't code golf; use a little white space. Proper var names wouldn't hurt, either. –  keithjgrant Dec 30 '12 at 14:07

Short solution #1:

n.toFixed(2).replace(/\d(?=(\d{3})+\.)/g, '$&,');

Short solution #2:

n.toFixed(2).replace(/./g, function(c, i, a) {
    return i && c !== "." && !((a.length - i) % 3) ? ',' + c : c;
});

TESTS:

1        --> "1.00"
12       --> "12.00"
123      --> "123.00"
1234     --> "1,234.00"
12345    --> "12,345.00"
123456   --> "123,456.00"
1234567  --> "1,234,567.00"
12345.67 --> "12,345.67"

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/hAfMM/


Extended solution:

You can also extend the prototype of Number object to add additional support of any number of decimals [0 .. n] and the size of number groups [0 .. x]:

/**
 * Number.prototype.format(n, x)
 * 
 * @param integer n: length of decimal
 * @param integer x: length of sections
 */
Number.prototype.format = function(n, x) {
    var re = '\\d(?=(\\d{' + (x || 3) + '})+' + (n > 0 ? '\\.' : '$') + ')';
    return this.toFixed(Math.max(0, ~~n)).replace(new RegExp(re, 'g'), '$&,');
};

1234..format();           // "1,234"
12345..format(2);         // "12,345.00"
123456.7.format(3, 2);    // "12,34,56.700"
123456.789.format(2, 4);  // "12,3456.79"

DEMO / TESTS: http://jsfiddle.net/hAfMM/435/


Super extended solution:

In this super extended version you may set different delimiter types:

/**
 * Number.prototype.format(n, x, s, c)
 * 
 * @param integer n: length of decimal
 * @param integer x: length of whole part
 * @param mixed   s: sections delimiter
 * @param mixed   c: decimal delimiter
 */
Number.prototype.format = function(n, x, s, c) {
    var re = '\\d(?=(\\d{' + (x || 3) + '})+' + (n > 0 ? '\\D' : '$') + ')',
        num = this.toFixed(Math.max(0, ~~n));

    return (c ? num.replace('.', c) : num).replace(new RegExp(re, 'g'), '$&' + (s || ','));
};

12345678.9.format(2, 3, '.', ',');  // "12.345.678,90"
123456.789.format(4, 4, ' ', ':');  // "12 3456:7890"
12345678.9.format(0, 3, '-');       // "12-345-679"

DEMO / TESTS: http://jsfiddle.net/hAfMM/612/

share|improve this answer
1  
CoffeeScript version with of VisioN & kalisjoshua regexp and way of specifying decimal place (so you can leave the default of 2 or specify 0 for no decimal): Number.prototype.toMoney = (decimal=2) -> @toFixed(decimal).replace /(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?:\.\d+)?$)/g, "$1," –  Eric Anderson Jun 18 '13 at 15:43
2  
+1 for the pure regexp solution –  Macario Aug 8 '13 at 22:44
2  
@Abbas Yeah, replace \. with $ (end of line), i.e. this.toFixed(0).replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+$)/g, "$1,"). –  VisioN Aug 15 '13 at 9:26
1  
@CedricSimon Please see the section Extended solution in the updated answer. You can use this solution for your purposes. –  VisioN Nov 27 '13 at 15:23
1  
@Michel Here is a super extended version, which supports different delimiter types: jsfiddle.net/hAfMM/610. –  VisioN Mar 17 at 12:47

Below is the Patrick Desjardins (alias Daok) code with a bit of comments added and some minor changes:

/* 
decimal_sep: character used as deciaml separtor, it defaults to '.' when omitted
thousands_sep: char used as thousands separator, it defaults to ',' when omitted
*/
Number.prototype.toMoney = function(decimals, decimal_sep, thousands_sep)
{ 
   var n = this,
   c = isNaN(decimals) ? 2 : Math.abs(decimals), //if decimal is zero we must take it, it means user does not want to show any decimal
   d = decimal_sep || '.', //if no decimal separator is passed we use the dot as default decimal separator (we MUST use a decimal separator)

   /*
   according to [http://stackoverflow.com/questions/411352/how-best-to-determine-if-an-argument-is-not-sent-to-the-javascript-function]
   the fastest way to check for not defined parameter is to use typeof value === 'undefined' 
   rather than doing value === undefined.
   */   
   t = (typeof thousands_sep === 'undefined') ? ',' : thousands_sep, //if you don't want to use a thousands separator you can pass empty string as thousands_sep value

   sign = (n < 0) ? '-' : '',

   //extracting the absolute value of the integer part of the number and converting to string
   i = parseInt(n = Math.abs(n).toFixed(c)) + '', 

   j = ((j = i.length) > 3) ? j % 3 : 0; 
   return sign + (j ? i.substr(0, j) + t : '') + i.substr(j).replace(/(\d{3})(?=\d)/g, "$1" + t) + (c ? d + Math.abs(n - i).toFixed(c).slice(2) : ''); 
}

and here some tests:

//some tests (do not forget parenthesis when using negative numbers and number with no decimals)
alert(123456789.67392.toMoney() + '\n' + 123456789.67392.toMoney(3) + '\n' + 123456789.67392.toMoney(0) + '\n' + (123456).toMoney() + '\n' + (123456).toMoney(0) + '\n' + 89.67392.toMoney() + '\n' + (89).toMoney());

//some tests (do not forget parenthesis when using negative numbers and number with no decimals)
alert((-123456789.67392).toMoney() + '\n' + (-123456789.67392).toMoney(-3));

The minor changes are:

  1. moved a bit the Math.abs(decimals) to be done only when is not NaN.

  2. decimal_sep can not be empty string anymore (a some sort of decimal separator is a MUST)

  3. we use typeof thousands_sep === 'undefined' as suggested in How best to determine if an argument is not sent to the JavaScript function

  4. (+n || 0) is not needed because this is a Number object

share|improve this answer
6  
You may want to use '10' as the radix in parseInt. Otherwise, any number that starts with '0' will use octal numbering. –  sohtimsso1970 Nov 15 '11 at 16:01
1  
@sohtimsso1970: sorry for the late response, but could you explain some more? I don't see where a number could be interpreted as octal. The parseInt is called on the absolute value of the INTEGER part of the number. The INTEGER part can not start with ZERO unless it's just a ZERO! And parseInt(0) === 0 either octal or decimal. –  Marco Demaio Feb 9 '12 at 12:20
1  
@Tracker1: I understood that a number starting with 0 is considered octal by parseInt. But in this code is IMPOSSIBLE for parseInt to receive 016 as input (or any other octal formatted value), because the argument passed to parseInt is 1st processed by Math.abs function. So there is no way for parseInt to receive a number that starts with zero unless it's just a zero or 0.nn (where nn are decimals). But both 0 and 0.nn strings would be converted by parseInt into a plain ZERO as suppsed to be. –  Marco Demaio Mar 20 '12 at 14:57

accounting.js is a tiny JavaScript library for number, money and currency formatting.

http://josscrowcroft.github.com/accounting.js/

share|improve this answer
2  
Looks like the IE7/IE8 bug is fixed. –  Mat Schaffer Jan 17 '12 at 19:41
2  
This is a great library, being able to pass the currency symbol is also a good idea, since all the currency details are contained in the single function call/settings –  farinspace Oct 19 '12 at 22:15
1  
This library is worth it for "toFixed" alone. –  user456584 Jan 18 '13 at 17:09
5  
@GasheK Man, this answer is ONLY good if you want the fastest, most worry-free, most efficient, and most accurate solution to the OP :) –  VoidKing Mar 21 '13 at 15:34

Take a look at the JavaScript Number object and see if it can help you.

toLocaleString() will format a number using location specific thousands separator.
toFixed() will round the number to a specific number of decimal places.

To use these at the same time the value must have its type changed back to a number because they both output a string.

Example:

Number(someNumber.toFixed(1)).toLocaleString()

share|improve this answer
1  
Looks like it'd be great, but there is little browser support at the moment –  acorncom Dec 6 '13 at 0:38

There are already some great answers here. Here's another attempt, just for fun:

function formatDollar(num) {
    var p = num.toFixed(2).split(".");
    return "$" + p[0].split("").reverse().reduce(function(acc, num, i, orig) {
        return  num + (i && !(i % 3) ? "," : "") + acc;
    }, "") + "." + p[1];
}

And some tests:

formatDollar(45664544.23423) // "$45,664,544.23"
formatDollar(45) // "$45.00"
formatDollar(123) // "$123.00"
formatDollar(7824) // "$7,824.00"
formatDollar(1) // "$1.00"
share|improve this answer
9  
A not about compatability: The reduce method was introduced in Ecmascript 1.8, and is not supported in Internet Explorer 8 and below. –  Blaise May 10 '12 at 12:07
up vote 16 down vote accepted

Ok, based on what you said, i'm using this:

var DecimalSeparator = Number("1.2").toLocaleString().substr(1,1);

var AmountWithCommas = Amount.toLocaleString();
var arParts = String(AmountWithCommas).split(DecimalSeparator);
var intPart = arParts[0];
var decPart = (arParts.length > 1 ? arParts[1] : '');
decPart = (decPart + '00').substr(0,2);

return '£ ' + intPart + DecimalSeparator + decPart;

I'm open to improvement suggestions (i'd prefer not to include YUI just to do this :-) ) I already know I should be detecting the "." instead of just using it as the decimal separator...

share|improve this answer
5  
Note that your version doesn't properly round to two decimal digits. For example, 3.706 would be formatted as "£ 3.70", not as "£ 3.71" as it's supposed to be. –  Ates Goral Sep 30 '08 at 23:33

http://code.google.com/p/javascript-number-formatter/

  • Short, fast and flexible. Only 75 lines including MIT license info, blank lines & comments.
  • Accept standard number formatting like #,##0.00 or with negation -000.####.
  • Accept any country format like # ##0,00, #,###.##, #'###.## or any type of non-numbering symbol.
  • Accept any numbers of digit grouping. #,##,#0.000 or #,###0.00 are all valid.
  • Accept any redundant/fool-proof formatting. ##,###,##.# or 0#,#00#.###0# are all OK.
  • Auto number rounding.
  • Simple interface, just supply mask & value like this: format( "0.0000", 3.141592)
share|improve this answer

There is a javascript port of the PHP function "number_format".

I find it very usefull as it is easy to use and recognisable for PHP developers.

function number_format (number, decimals, dec_point, thousands_sep) {
// Formats a number with grouped thousands
//
// version: 906.1806
// discuss at: http://phpjs.org/functions/number_format
// +   original by: Jonas Raoni Soares Silva (http://www.jsfromhell.com)
// +   improved by: Kevin van Zonneveld (http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net)
// +     bugfix by: Michael White (http://getsprink.com)
// +     bugfix by: Benjamin Lupton
// +     bugfix by: Allan Jensen (http://www.winternet.no)
// +    revised by: Jonas Raoni Soares Silva (http://www.jsfromhell.com)
// +     bugfix by: Howard Yeend
// +    revised by: Luke Smith (http://lucassmith.name)
// +     bugfix by: Diogo Resende
// +     bugfix by: Rival
// +     input by: Kheang Hok Chin (http://www.distantia.ca/)
// +     improved by: davook
// +     improved by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
// +     input by: Jay Klehr
// +     improved by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
// +     input by: Amir Habibi (http://www.residence-mixte.com/)
// +     bugfix by: Brett Zamir (http://brett-zamir.me)
// *     example 1: number_format(1234.56);
// *     returns 1: '1,235'
// *     example 2: number_format(1234.56, 2, ',', ' ');
// *     returns 2: '1 234,56'
// *     example 3: number_format(1234.5678, 2, '.', '');
// *     returns 3: '1234.57'
// *     example 4: number_format(67, 2, ',', '.');
// *     returns 4: '67,00'
// *     example 5: number_format(1000);
// *     returns 5: '1,000'
// *     example 6: number_format(67.311, 2);
// *     returns 6: '67.31'
// *     example 7: number_format(1000.55, 1);
// *     returns 7: '1,000.6'
// *     example 8: number_format(67000, 5, ',', '.');
// *     returns 8: '67.000,00000'
// *     example 9: number_format(0.9, 0);
// *     returns 9: '1'
// *     example 10: number_format('1.20', 2);
// *     returns 10: '1.20'
// *     example 11: number_format('1.20', 4);
// *     returns 11: '1.2000'
// *     example 12: number_format('1.2000', 3);
// *     returns 12: '1.200'
var n = number, prec = decimals;

var toFixedFix = function (n,prec) {
    var k = Math.pow(10,prec);
    return (Math.round(n*k)/k).toString();
};

n = !isFinite(+n) ? 0 : +n;
prec = !isFinite(+prec) ? 0 : Math.abs(prec);
var sep = (typeof thousands_sep === 'undefined') ? ',' : thousands_sep;
var dec = (typeof dec_point === 'undefined') ? '.' : dec_point;

var s = (prec > 0) ? toFixedFix(n, prec) : toFixedFix(Math.round(n), prec); //fix for IE parseFloat(0.55).toFixed(0) = 0;

var abs = toFixedFix(Math.abs(n), prec);
var _, i;

if (abs >= 1000) {
    _ = abs.split(/\D/);
    i = _[0].length % 3 || 3;

    _[0] = s.slice(0,i + (n < 0)) +
          _[0].slice(i).replace(/(\d{3})/g, sep+'$1');
    s = _.join(dec);
} else {
    s = s.replace('.', dec);
}

var decPos = s.indexOf(dec);
if (prec >= 1 && decPos !== -1 && (s.length-decPos-1) < prec) {
    s += new Array(prec-(s.length-decPos-1)).join(0)+'0';
}
else if (prec >= 1 && decPos === -1) {
    s += dec+new Array(prec).join(0)+'0';
}
return s; }

http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net/techblog/article/javascript_equivalent_for_phps_number_format/

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I totally forgot about this site. Excellent resource. –  Dr Casper Black Jan 20 '11 at 12:55

I use the library Globalize (from Microsoft): https://github.com/jquery/globalize

It's a great project to localize numbers, currencies and dates and to have them automatically formatted the right way according to the user locale! ...and despite it should be a jQuery extension, it's currently a 100% independent library. I suggest you all to try it out! :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, why is this not upvoted more? Big standardized library for all sorts of formatting. Industry-standard formatting parameters with correct globalization. Great answer!! –  pbarranis Sep 10 '13 at 2:11

A shorter method (for inserting space, comma or point) with regular expression ?

    Number.prototype.toCurrencyString=function(){
        return this.toFixed(2).replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+\b)/g,'$1 ');
    }

    n=12345678.9;
    alert(n.toCurrencyString());
share|improve this answer

So why hasn't anyone suggested the following?

(2500).toLocaleString("en-GB", {style: "currency", currency: "GBP", minimumFractionDigits: 2}) 

Works for most/some browsers:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/toLocaleString#Browser_Compatibility

share|improve this answer
1  
Because 'locales' and 'options' arguments are supported just by a very small number of browsers, like Chrome 24, IE11 and Opera 15. Firefox, Safari and older versions of others still don't support it. –  VisioN Sep 25 '13 at 6:50
1  
Agreed, it's not fully supported across all browsers (yet), but it's still a solution. (And arguably the most valid solution, as its forward compatible with the non-supported browsers, and it's a documented feature of the Javascript api.) –  Nick G Sep 25 '13 at 22:59

Patrick Desjardins' answer looks good, but I prefer my javascript simple. Here's a function I just wrote to take a number in and return it in currency format (minus the dollar sign)

// Format numbers to two decimals with commas
function formatDollar(num) {
    var p = num.toFixed(2).split(".");
    var chars = p[0].split("").reverse();
    var newstr = '';
    var count = 0;
    for (x in chars) {
        count++;
        if(count%3 == 1 && count != 1) {
            newstr = chars[x] + ',' + newstr;
        } else {
            newstr = chars[x] + newstr;
        }
    }
    return newstr + "." + p[1];
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for IE compatibility. Just need to stick a dollar sign in front of the return statement. –  Tim P. Jun 28 '12 at 14:17

I suggest the NumberFormat class from Google Visualization API.

You can do something like this:

var formatter = new google.visualization.NumberFormat({
    prefix: '$',
    pattern: '#,###,###.##'
});

formatter.formatValue(1000000); // $ 1,000,000

I hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

As usually, there are multiple ways of doing the same thing but I would avoid using Number.prototype.toLocaleString since it can return different values based on the user settings.

I also don't recommend extending the Number.prototype - extending native objects prototypes is a bad practice since it can cause conflicts with other people code (e.g. libraries/frameworks/plugins) and may not be compatible with future JavaScript implementations/versions.

I believe that Regular Expressions are the best approach for the problem, here is my implementation:

/**
 * Converts number into currency format
 * @param {number} number   Number that should be converted.
 * @param {string} [decimalSeparator]    Decimal separator, defaults to '.'.
 * @param {string} [thousandsSeparator]    Thousands separator, defaults to ','.
 * @param {int} [nDecimalDigits]    Number of decimal digits, defaults to `2`.
 * @return {string} Formatted string (e.g. numberToCurrency(12345.67) returns '12,345.67')
 */
function numberToCurrency(number, decimalSeparator, thousandsSeparator, nDecimalDigits){
    //default values
    decimalSeparator = decimalSeparator || '.';
    thousandsSeparator = thousandsSeparator || ',';
    nDecimalDigits = nDecimalDigits == null? 2 : nDecimalDigits;

    var fixed = number.toFixed(nDecimalDigits), //limit/add decimal digits
        parts = new RegExp('^(-?\\d{1,3})((?:\\d{3})+)(\\.(\\d{'+ nDecimalDigits +'}))?$').exec( fixed ); //separate begin [$1], middle [$2] and decimal digits [$4]

    if(parts){ //number >= 1000 || number <= -1000
        return parts[1] + parts[2].replace(/\d{3}/g, thousandsSeparator + '$&') + (parts[4] ? decimalSeparator + parts[4] : '');
    }else{
        return fixed.replace('.', decimalSeparator);
    }
}

edited on 2010/08/30: added option to set number of decimal digits. *edited on 2011/08/23: added option to set number of decimal digits to zero.*

share|improve this answer

This might be a little late, but here's a method I just worked up for a coworker to add a locale-aware .toCurrencyString() function to all numbers. The internalization is for number grouping only, NOT the currency sign - if you're outputting dollars, use "$" as supplied, because $123 4567 in Japan or China is the same number of USD as $1,234,567 is here in the US. If you're outputting euro/etc., then change the currency sign from "$".

Declare this anywhere in your HEAD or wherever necessary, just before you need to use it:

Number.prototype.toCurrencyString = function() { return "$" + Math.floor(this).toLocaleString() + (this % 1).toFixed(2).toLocaleString().replace(/^0/,''); }

Then you're done! Use (number).toCurrencyString() anywhere you need to output the number as currency.

var MyNumber = 123456789.125;
alert(MyNumber.toCurrencyString()); // alerts "$123,456,789.13"
share|improve this answer
function CurrencyFormatted(amount)
{
    var i = parseFloat(amount);
    if(isNaN(i)) { i = 0.00; }
    var minus = '';
    if(i < 0) { minus = '-'; }
    i = Math.abs(i);
    i = parseInt((i + .005) * 100);
    i = i / 100;
    s = new String(i);
    if(s.indexOf('.') < 0) { s += '.00'; }
    if(s.indexOf('.') == (s.length - 2)) { s += '0'; }
    s = minus + s;
    return s;
}

From WillMaster.

share|improve this answer

A simple option for proper comma placement by reversing the string first and basic regexp.

String.prototype.reverse = function() {
    return this.split('').reverse().join('');
};

Number.prototype.toCurrency = function( round_decimal /*boolean*/ ) {       
     // format decimal or round to nearest integer
     var n = this.toFixed( round_decimal ? 0 : 2 );

     // convert to a string, add commas every 3 digits from left to right 
     // by reversing string
     return (n + '').reverse().replace( /(\d{3})(?=\d)/g, '$1,' ).reverse();
};
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 interesting approach –  Marco Demaio Feb 9 '12 at 12:15

Patrick Desjardins (ex Daok)'s example worked well for me. I ported over to coffeescript if anyone is interested.

Number.prototype.toMoney = (decimals = 2, decimal_separator = ".", thousands_separator = ",") ->
    n = this
    c = if isNaN(decimals) then 2 else Math.abs decimals
    sign = if n < 0 then "-" else ""
    i = parseInt(n = Math.abs(n).toFixed(c)) + ''
    j = if (j = i.length) > 3 then j % 3 else 0
    x = if j then i.substr(0, j) + thousands_separator else ''
    y = i.substr(j).replace(/(\d{3})(?=\d)/g, "$1" + thousands_separator)
    z = if c then decimal_separator + Math.abs(n - i).toFixed(c).slice(2) else ''
    sign + x + y + z
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for coffeescript –  Nick Perkins Nov 12 '11 at 15:03

Just created a js library to make it easy to format numbers Numeral.js

share|improve this answer

Here are some solutions, all pass the test suite, test suite and benchmark included, if you want copy and paste to test, try This Gist.

Method 0 (RegExp)

Base on http://stackoverflow.com/a/14428340/1877620, but fix if there is no decimal point.

if (typeof Number.prototype.format === 'undefined') {
    Number.prototype.format = function (precision) {
        if (!isFinite(this)) {
            return this.toString();
        }

        var a = this.toFixed(precision).split('.');
        a[0] = a[0].replace(/\d(?=(\d{3})+$)/g, '$&,');
        return a.join('.');
    }
}

Method 1

if (typeof Number.prototype.format === 'undefined') {
    Number.prototype.format = function (precision) {
        if (!isFinite(this)) {
            return this.toString();
        }

        var a = this.toFixed(precision).split('.'),
            // skip the '-' sign
            head = Number(this < 0);

        // skip the digits that's before the first thousands separator 
        head += (a[0].length - head) % 3 || 3;

        a[0] = a[0].slice(0, head) + a[0].slice(head).replace(/\d{3}/g, ',$&');
        return a.join('.');
    };
}

Method 2 (Split to Array)

if (typeof Number.prototype.format === 'undefined') {
    Number.prototype.format = function (precision) {
        if (!isFinite(this)) {
            return this.toString();
        }

        var a = this.toFixed(precision).split('.');

        a[0] = a[0]
            .split('').reverse().join('')
            .replace(/\d{3}(?=\d)/g, '$&,')
            .split('').reverse().join('');

        return a.join('.');
    };
}

Method 3 (Loop)

if (typeof Number.prototype.format === 'undefined') {
    Number.prototype.format = function (precision) {
        if (!isFinite(this)) {
            return this.toString();
        }

        var a = this.toFixed(precision).split('');
        a.push('.');

        var i = a.indexOf('.') - 3;
        while (i > 0 && a[i-1] !== '-') {
            a.splice(i, 0, ',');
            i -= 3;
        }

        a.pop();
        return a.join('');
    };
}

Usage Example

console.log('======== Demo ========')
console.log(
    (1234567).format(0),
    (1234.56).format(2),
    (-1234.56).format(0)
);
var n = 0;
for (var i=1; i<20; i++) {
    n = (n * 10) + (i % 10)/100;
    console.log(n.format(2), (-n).format(2));
}

Separator

If we want custom thousands separator or decimal separator, use replace():

123456.78.format(2).replace(',', ' ').replace('.', ' ');

Test suite

function assertEqual(a, b) {
    if (a !== b) {
        throw a + ' !== ' + b;
    }
}

function test(format_function) {
    console.log(format_function);
    assertEqual('NaN', format_function.call(NaN, 0))
    assertEqual('Infinity', format_function.call(Infinity, 0))
    assertEqual('-Infinity', format_function.call(-Infinity, 0))

    assertEqual('0', format_function.call(0, 0))
    assertEqual('0.00', format_function.call(0, 2))
    assertEqual('1', format_function.call(1, 0))
    assertEqual('-1', format_function.call(-1, 0))
    // decimal padding
    assertEqual('1.00', format_function.call(1, 2))
    assertEqual('-1.00', format_function.call(-1, 2))
    // decimal rounding
    assertEqual('0.12', format_function.call(0.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('0.1235', format_function.call(0.123456, 4))
    assertEqual('-0.12', format_function.call(-0.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-0.1235', format_function.call(-0.123456, 4))
    // thousands separator
    assertEqual('1,234', format_function.call(1234.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('12,345', format_function.call(12345.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('123,456', format_function.call(123456.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('1,234,567', format_function.call(1234567.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('12,345,678', format_function.call(12345678.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('123,456,789', format_function.call(123456789.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-1,234', format_function.call(-1234.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-12,345', format_function.call(-12345.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-123,456', format_function.call(-123456.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-1,234,567', format_function.call(-1234567.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-12,345,678', format_function.call(-12345678.123456, 0))
    assertEqual('-123,456,789', format_function.call(-123456789.123456, 0))
    // thousands separator and decimal
    assertEqual('1,234.12', format_function.call(1234.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('12,345.12', format_function.call(12345.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('123,456.12', format_function.call(123456.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('1,234,567.12', format_function.call(1234567.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('12,345,678.12', format_function.call(12345678.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('123,456,789.12', format_function.call(123456789.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-1,234.12', format_function.call(-1234.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-12,345.12', format_function.call(-12345.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-123,456.12', format_function.call(-123456.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-1,234,567.12', format_function.call(-1234567.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-12,345,678.12', format_function.call(-12345678.123456, 2))
    assertEqual('-123,456,789.12', format_function.call(-123456789.123456, 2))
}

console.log('======== Testing ========');
test(Number.prototype.format);
test(Number.prototype.format1);
test(Number.prototype.format2);
test(Number.prototype.format3);

Benchmark

function benchmark(f) {
    var start = new Date().getTime();
    f();
    return new Date().getTime() - start;
}

function benchmark_format(f) {
    console.log(f);
    time = benchmark(function () {
        for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
            f.call(123456789, 0);
            f.call(123456789, 2);
        }
    });
    console.log(time.format(0) + 'ms');
}

// if not using async, browser will stop responding while running.
// this will create a new thread to benchmark
async = [];
function next() {
    setTimeout(function () {
        f = async.shift();
        f && f();
        next();
    }, 10);
}

console.log('======== Benchmark ========');
async.push(function () { benchmark_format(Number.prototype.format); });
next();
share|improve this answer

The main part is inserting the thousand-separators, that could be done like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
function ins1000Sep(val){
  val = val.split(".");
  val[0] = val[0].split("").reverse().join("");
  val[0] = val[0].replace(/(\d{3})/g,"$1,");
  val[0] = val[0].split("").reverse().join("");
  val[0] = val[0].indexOf(",")==0?val[0].substring(1):val[0];
  return val.join(".");
}
function rem1000Sep(val){
  return val.replace(/,/g,"");
}
function formatNum(val){
  val = Math.round(val*100)/100;
  val = (""+val).indexOf(".")>-1 ? val + "00" : val + ".00";
  var dec = val.indexOf(".");
  return dec == val.length-3 || dec == 0 ? val : val.substring(0,dec+3);
}
</script>

<button onclick="alert(ins1000Sep(formatNum(12313231)));">
share|improve this answer

The YUI codebase uses the following formmating:

format: function(nData, oConfig) {
    oConfig = oConfig || {};

    if(!YAHOO.lang.isNumber(nData)) {
        nData *= 1;
    }

    if(YAHOO.lang.isNumber(nData)) {
        var sOutput = nData + "";
        var sDecimalSeparator = (oConfig.decimalSeparator) ? oConfig.decimalSeparator : ".";
        var nDotIndex;

        // Manage decimals
        if(YAHOO.lang.isNumber(oConfig.decimalPlaces)) {
            // Round to the correct decimal place
            var nDecimalPlaces = oConfig.decimalPlaces;
            var nDecimal = Math.pow(10, nDecimalPlaces);
            sOutput = Math.round(nData*nDecimal)/nDecimal + "";
            nDotIndex = sOutput.lastIndexOf(".");

            if(nDecimalPlaces > 0) {
                // Add the decimal separator
                if(nDotIndex < 0) {
                    sOutput += sDecimalSeparator;
                    nDotIndex = sOutput.length-1;
                }
                // Replace the "."
                else if(sDecimalSeparator !== "."){
                    sOutput = sOutput.replace(".",sDecimalSeparator);
                }
                // Add missing zeros
                while((sOutput.length - 1 - nDotIndex) < nDecimalPlaces) {
                    sOutput += "0";
                }
            }
        }

        // Add the thousands separator
        if(oConfig.thousandsSeparator) {
            var sThousandsSeparator = oConfig.thousandsSeparator;
            nDotIndex = sOutput.lastIndexOf(sDecimalSeparator);
            nDotIndex = (nDotIndex > -1) ? nDotIndex : sOutput.length;
            var sNewOutput = sOutput.substring(nDotIndex);
            var nCount = -1;
            for (var i=nDotIndex; i>0; i--) {
                nCount++;
                if ((nCount%3 === 0) && (i !== nDotIndex)) {
                    sNewOutput = sThousandsSeparator + sNewOutput;
                }
                sNewOutput = sOutput.charAt(i-1) + sNewOutput;
            }
            sOutput = sNewOutput;
        }

        // Prepend prefix
        sOutput = (oConfig.prefix) ? oConfig.prefix + sOutput : sOutput;

        // Append suffix
        sOutput = (oConfig.suffix) ? sOutput + oConfig.suffix : sOutput;

        return sOutput;
    }
    // Still not a Number, just return unaltered
    else {
        return nData;
    }
}

it would need editing as the YUI library is configurable, like replacing oConfig.decimalSeparator with "."

share|improve this answer
2  
Too long, and i'd have to include YUI –  Daniel Magliola Sep 29 '08 at 15:25
2  
My first reaction was "lol--too long, YUI sucks"...but upon reconsideration, it's not bad code, it's just very...complete. It checks whether the arg is actually a number ( not done by other posters, and the only part that requires YUI library ). It does rounding ( not done by all posters ). It has configurable separator, prefix, and suffix. Lastly, the code is commented, and uses no regex and no tricky one-liners. So...I am giving you a +1 to compensate for others -1...this code is not bad -- it could be adapted even if not using YUI. –  Nick Perkins Nov 15 '11 at 19:13

This answer meets the following criteria:

  • Does not depend on an external dependency.
  • Does support localization.
  • Does have tests/proofs.
  • Does use simple and best coding practices (no complicated regex's, uses standard coding patterns).

This code is built on concepts from other answers. It's execution speed should be among the better posted here if that's a concern.

var decimalCharacter = Number("1.1").toLocaleString().substr(1,1);
var defaultCurrencyMarker = "$";
function formatCurrency(number, currencyMarker) {
    if (typeof number != "number")
        number = parseFloat(number, 10);

    // if NaN is passed in or comes from the parseFloat, set it to 0.
    if (isNaN(number))
        number = 0;

    var sign = number < 0 ? "-" : "";
    number = Math.abs(number);  // so our signage goes before the $ symbol.

    var integral = Math.floor(number);
    var formattedIntegral = integral.toLocaleString();

    // IE returns "##.00" while others return "##"
    formattedIntegral = formattedIntegral.split(decimalCharacter)[0];

    var decimal = Math.round((number - integral) * 100);
    return sign + (currencyMarker || defaultCurrencyMarker) +
        formattedIntegral  +
        decimalCharacter +
        decimal.toString() + (decimal < 10 ? "0" : "");
}

These tests only work on a US locale machine. This decision was made for simplicity and because this could cause of crappy input (bad auto-localization) allowing for crappy output issues.

var tests = [
    // [ input, expected result ]
    [123123, "$123,123.00"],    // no decimal
    [123123.123, "$123,123.12"],    // decimal rounded down
    [123123.126, "$123,123.13"],    // decimal rounded up
    [123123.4, "$123,123.40"],  // single decimal
    ["123123", "$123,123.00"],  // repeat subset of the above using string input.
    ["123123.123", "$123,123.12"],
    ["123123.126", "$123,123.13"],
    [-123, "-$123.00"]  // negatives
];

for (var testIndex=0; testIndex < tests.length; testIndex++) {
    var test = tests[testIndex];
    var formatted = formatCurrency(test[0]);
    if (formatted == test[1]) {
        console.log("Test passed, \"" + test[0] + "\" resulted in \"" + formatted + "\"");
    } else {
        console.error("Test failed. Expected \"" + test[1] + "\", got \"" + formatted + "\"");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The new ECMAScript Internationalization API offers a numberformat function. It works, except it doesn't appear to be possible to insert a space between the currency symbol and the amount.

Using that API you do this:

// Create our number formatter.
var formatter = new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', {
  style: 'currency',
  currency: 'USD',
  minimumFractionDigits: 2,
});

alert(formatter.format(2500)); /* $2500.00 */

See this answer for more info.

share|improve this answer

A function to handle currency output, including negatives.

Sample Output:
$5.23
-$5.23

function formatCurrency(total) {
    var neg = false;
    if(total < 0) {
        neg = true;
        total = Math.abs(total);
    }
    return (neg ? "-$" : '$') + parseFloat(total, 10).toFixed(2).replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+\.)/g, "$1,").toString();
}
share|improve this answer

This might work:

function format_currency(v, number_of_decimals, decimal_separator, currency_sign){
  return (isNaN(v)? v : currency_sign + parseInt(v||0).toLocaleString() + decimal_separator + (v*1).toFixed(number_of_decimals).slice(-number_of_decimals));
}

No loops, no regexes, no arrays, no exotic conditionals.

share|improve this answer

A quiker way with regexp ?

Number.prototype.toMonetaryString=function(){var n=this.toFixed(2),m;
// var=this.toFixed(2).replace(/\./,','); for comma separator
// with a space for thousands separator
  while ((m=n.replace(/(\d)(\d\d\d)\b/g,'$1 $2'))!=n) n=m; 
  return m;
}
String.prototype.fromMonetaryToNumber=function(s){
  return this.replace(/[^\d-]+/g,'')/100;
}   
share|improve this answer
String.prototype.toPrice = function () {
    var v;
    if (/^\d+(,\d+)$/.test(this))
        v = this.replace(/,/, '.');
    else if (/^\d+((,\d{3})*(\.\d+)?)?$/.test(this))
        v = this.replace(/,/g, "");
    else if (/^\d+((.\d{3})*(,\d+)?)?$/.test(this))
        v = this.replace(/\./g, "").replace(/,/, ".");
    var x = parseFloat(v).toFixed(2).toString().split("."),
    x1 = x[0],
    x2 = ((x.length == 2) ? "." + x[1] : ".00"),
    exp = /^([0-9]+)(\d{3})/;
    while (exp.test(x1))
        x1 = x1.replace(exp, "$1" + "," + "$2");
    return x1 + x2;
}

alert("123123".toPrice()); //123,123.00
alert("123123,316".toPrice()); //123,123.32
alert("12,312,313.33213".toPrice()); //12,312,313.33
alert("123.312.321,32132".toPrice()); //123,312,321.32
share|improve this answer

Coffeescript for Patrick's popular answer above:

Number::formatMoney = (decimalPlaces, decimalChar, thousandsChar) ->  
  n = this  
  c = decimalPlaces  
  d = decimalChar  
  t = thousandsChar  
  c = (if isNaN(c = Math.abs(c)) then 2 else c)  
  d = (if d is undefined then "." else d)  
  t = (if t is undefined then "," else t)  
  s = (if n < 0 then "-" else "")  
  i = parseInt(n = Math.abs(+n or 0).toFixed(c)) + ""  
  j = (if (j = i.length) > 3 then j % 3 else 0)  
  s + (if j then i.substr(0, j) + t else "") + i.substr(j).replace(/(\d{3})(?=\d)/g, "$1" + t) + (if c then d + Math.abs(n - i).toFixed(c).slice(2) else "")  
share|improve this answer

protected by VisioN Feb 11 '13 at 9:46

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.