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I've stumbled into this affirmation and It changes my concept of what scope in Java is. C My concept used to be "Scope refers to the section of code that has access to a declared variable" Does anybody any clearer quote for this?

Example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int x = 5;
    amIOutOfScope();        
    System.out.println("Am in the x variable scope again?");
}

private static void amIOutOfScope(){        
    System.out.println("am I outta scope? I can't access x here, Does it mean I'm outta scope?");
    //System.out.println(x);//wrong as hell
}

Is this affirmation True? If so what happens when you go to the method amIOutOfScope() are you out of scope from variable x? What would you call that?. Can anybody clarify this to me please?

UPDATE: This afirmation is true for the book SCJA Sun Certified Java Associate Study Guide - Exam CX-310-019 (McGraw-Hill, 2009, chapter 5) taken from a certification exam question number 6.

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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, Don Roby, Brent Worden, Julius, sgarizvi Feb 16 '13 at 9:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I don't see a real question. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 16 '13 at 0:42
    
    
cs.berkeley.edu/~jrs/4/lec/08 –  user1428716 Feb 16 '13 at 0:46
1  
What ever happened to the days where new programmers would actually try something to figure out if it worked or not, instead of just posting a question here instead? Here's a quick tip: Try the code you posted, and see if you can access x inside amIOutOfScope(). What happens? Trial and error (especially of basics) is usually the fastest way to learn. –  Ken White Feb 16 '13 at 0:55
1  
This is conceptual certification exam question Ken, I know how to use a debugger, but thank you –  PbxMan Feb 16 '13 at 0:56

4 Answers 4

The definition of "scope" in java is here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-6.html#jls-6.3

But basically your concept is right. The scope is the region of code where the name you assign has meaning.

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1  
So if i'm in the function amIOutOfScope(). Would be I out of scope therefore the affirmation "When a variable goes out of scope, it can never go back into scope" is false? –  PbxMan Feb 16 '13 at 0:46
1  
"you" are not in or out of scope. The variable (or actually any identifier) has a scope (local/class/class static) and we say it is or is not in scope at different places in code. –  Miserable Variable Feb 16 '13 at 0:50
    
Perhaps you are tripped up by your terminology.. YOU do not go out of scope. What happens when you call the amIOutOfScope method is that you create a new scope (stack frame as amit says). Then the "you" (the execution thread) go to that new scope. The variable is not in the current scope, but is still in the scope you left, and it will be there when your method returns. –  Gus Feb 16 '13 at 0:51
    
OK so it would be wrong to say that you cannot access x in the method amIOutOfScope() because you are out of scope? –  PbxMan Feb 16 '13 at 0:53
1  
It would be an odd way to phrase it. One usually says that the variable is out of scope, but you could say that you are not in the same scope as the variable. Most of us think of scope as where we are, and the variables either are where we are or not where we are. I'll admit it's a bit arbitrary. –  Gus Feb 16 '13 at 0:55

Method variable scope is related to Stack space in JVM...

so here stack space of main method has x variable...but once it goes in amIOutOfScope() method..we refer to different stack space....where variable does not exist....

so it does not mean that variable went out of scope...

when you return from amIOutOfScope()..you go back in stack space of main method where the variable x still exists...

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The method amIOutOfScope can only see the variables defined inside the method including parameters and class leve variables. Here x does not meet that criterion.

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We can divide scope into two major categories:

Local

These variables are in functions. They can only be accessed from within that function.

Local variables are restricted to their enclosing { and }, also known as a block. They are also inaccessible before declaration and before certain assignment. What I mean by this is

{
    //aVar is not accessible here
    {
        //aVar is not accessible here
        Object aVar;
        //aVar access will not compile
        if(aCond()) aVar = new Object();
        //aVar access will not compile unless you did if(true)
        aVar = new Object();
        //aVar is accessible here
        {
            //aVar is accessible here
        }
        //aVar is accessible here
    }
    //aVar is not accessible here
}
{
    //aVar is not accessible here
}

A different method would be a different enclosing set of brackets, therefore out of scope.

Unless...

Global

Global variables are always accessible throughout the file. Global variables are declared outside of functions, in the class's block, and hence all blocks can access them. Global variables can be accessed with: FileName.variable or objectName.variable. Whether you use the file name or an object's name depends on if it's static or not.

In addition, methods are also affected by global scope.

Here is an example of a global variable:

public class Foo {
    public static int bar = 10;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(bar);
    }
}

Static

If the variable is static then it is constant for all instances of that object. (remember that all Java files are really objects)

If the variable is not static, then it is unique for each instance of that object.

That's not really scope though

Private/Public/Package Private

Anything that is marked with private is accessible throughout the file but ONLY the file. This is like static from C.

Anything that is marked with public is accessible from any file. This is similar to extern from C.

Anything that is not marked, for example int x; is considered package private. This means that any file in that same package (folder) can access it. So if I have Foo.bar() in the package x.y, any other class in package x.y can call Foo.bar(), but classes in x.z cannot.

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